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Polish a New 991S on delivery

 
Old 10-03-2012, 05:31 AM
  #1  
Romantic911
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Default Polish a New 991S on delivery

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As per my Porsche Dealer, Full body polish should be carried out on my New deliverd 991s to remove any residual left over glu from the manufacture packing - protective foam and white shield.
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:19 AM
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Depends on what the dealer means by "full body polish." I would clay bar the car-give it a full detail, as normal shipping does do a lot to a car.
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Old 10-03-2012, 09:10 AM
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As far as I am concerned, the dealer should do whatever is necessary to remove any glue residue, etc. from the car.

As Alstoy said, a clay barring does amazing things even on a brand new car as a lot of contaminants get into the paint during transportation. Ideally, a full polish and sealant application should be done after the clay bar.

The clay bar and polish are more than what I think most dealers would do for new car prep. To be honest, most dealership "detailers" are not very good and I would rather either myself or someone I really trust be the only ones to put a polisher to my new baby. I've some some really awful jobs done on new cars at the dealer.
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by brianja View Post
As far as I am concerned, the dealer should do whatever is necessary to remove any glue residue, etc. from the car.

As Alstoy said, a clay barring does amazing things even on a brand new car as a lot of contaminants get into the paint during transportation. Ideally, a full polish and sealant application should be done after the clay bar.

The clay bar and polish are more than what I think most dealers would do for new car prep. To be honest, most dealership "detailers" are not very good and I would rather either myself or someone I really trust be the only ones to put a polisher to my new baby. I've some some really awful jobs done on new cars at the dealer.
+1
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:59 AM
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Check a dealer's wash rack (tent, carport, etc. where they wash cars). If there's a nylon brush anywhere in sight, don't let them touch your car. Even if they agree not to use it, they're morons. Morons are ingenious, and they'll find another way to damage your car.

I went to a highly recommended dealership's body shop the last time goatgirl decided to play chicken with an innocent motorist and it ended up being a tie. I saw the nylon bursh on the end of a mop handle. I told them I didn't want them washing goatgirl's car after the repair. They told me I was "trouble" and they didn't want to do business with me.

I have "PLEASE DO NOT WASH THIS CAR" signs on posterboard when I take my cars in for service: one hangs from the rear view mirror, one taped in each rear, side window.

"Polish," by definition is the removal of material from the finish surface. A new car doesn't need polishing, it needs cleaning and sealing.

There's a theory (less valid with modern acrylic paints) that you shouldn't wax them for a month to let them fully cure (dry) before sealing. But, a good layer of wax is a protectant from scratches, contaminants, and oxidation.

One of my former perverse pleasures was hitting Golden Corral for breakfast Saturday morning. I'd get a window seat right by the parking lot, where church groups, Scouts, school bands, or kids' sports teams would have fund rasing car washes, and I'd watch them tear into the cars' clearcoats with a nylon brush. Rub-a-dub-dub!
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Old 10-03-2012, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by goatboy View Post
"Polish," by definition is the removal of material from the finish surface. A new car doesn't need polishing, it needs cleaning and sealing.

There's a theory (less valid with modern acrylic paints) that you shouldn't wax them for a month to let them fully cure (dry) before sealing. But, a good layer of wax is a protectant from scratches, contaminants, and oxidation.

One of my former perverse pleasures was hitting Golden Corral for breakfast Saturday morning. I'd get a window seat right by the parking lot, where church groups, Scouts, school bands, or kids' sports teams would have fund rasing car washes, and I'd watch them tear into the cars' clearcoats with a nylon brush. Rub-a-dub-dub!
I like your idea of checking out the dealer's wash area!

A new car will need to be clay barred to get rid of contaminants in the paint. Just the act of claying the car will introduce micro-marring and small swirls that will need to be machine polished out before a sealant is applied.

There is no longer any need to wait a month to seal or wax a car. Firstly, the paint is baked at the factory to cure it. Secondly, it typically takes a month for a car to get from the factory to your dealership, so any additional curing time that could be need (it isn't) is over by the time you get the car anyway.

I'm always so amazed by those fund raser car washes. I almost prefer to give them a donation to stay far far away from my car :-)

I had a garage in Manhattan do me an unrequested / surprise "favor" one night when I parked there by running my car through the automated car wash they had for the rental cars they stored there. When I picked it up in the AM it was full of scratches. The entire car needed to be polished and detailed. Hours of work for me. The attendant who did it was so proud of what he did that I couldn't be mean to him about it, but I did explain that it was not just the only time the car was in an auto car wash, but that it was also the first time it was ever washed by someone other than me! Ugh.
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Old 10-04-2012, 09:35 AM
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Thanks guys .. So do you think that I should instructs them to only wax - seal only?
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Old 10-04-2012, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Romantic911 View Post
Thanks guys .. So do you think that I should instructs them to only wax - seal only?
Your new car *needs* only to be CAREFULLY washed! And you should do it with the proper non detergent carwash soap and totally clean microfiber mit and towells just to get the pleasure of touching it, and avioding a possible uncaring low paid washer at the dealership.

An application of a spray- on liquid high tech wax or detailer (like Maguires) is simple and easy and will give all the protection needed. Clay baring cant hurt- but doing it right means removing any wax that is on it first.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:31 PM
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I'd tell the dealer to not to polish my new car. A new paint job should not need a machine polish (machine polishing can take some of the clear coat off and if done improperly - can take too much of the clear coat off). A clay barring is fine - but only if it was exposed to contaminates during shipping. You can generally feel clear coat surface contaminates by gently passing your clean hand over the surface in question. If it did need the clay bar treatement, I'd do it myself as no one is going to take as good of care of your car as you will.

No dealer washes, EVER, for me...I once had a brand new set of aftermarket rims ruined by a dealer wash when they used harsh wheel cleaner chemicals and "clouded" the clear coat. I had to argue with them for 3 months to get them to fess up / pay up.
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Old 10-04-2012, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by goatboy View Post
Check a dealer's wash rack (tent, carport, etc. where they wash cars). If there's a nylon brush anywhere in sight, don't let them touch your car.
I think this is a great idea, even before you order the car.

In one local Porsche dealer, the car goes in an automated "bay" ... exactly the kind of cost-saving that's great for the P&L of the dealership, not so great for the customer.

If there are designated staff washing the cars and they are keen to engage in conversation and impress with their knowledge and skill, great. If they've got an old bucket and a stack of towels from a laundry service ...

I want to see two or three bucket method, foam gun, a trash can full of discarded pads and buffs, a closed cabinet with fresh supplies kept away from dust and sunlight. A filtered water rinse is a plus, but you'll only get that level of detail at a detailer and it will take a full day or two. They need to tape off windows and seals, lights, etc. There's application-specific brushes and solvents, soaps and lotions and potions for inside and out.

Don't begrudge the OCD detailer a fair profit for his work -- expect to pay up. It's quite interesting (at least, to some) to watch the videos the pro detailers post to show off their work at sites like autopia.org. Perhaps RL should have a detailer-specific forum? (there's this: RL Concours but it's not a lot)
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:17 AM
  #11  
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I'm new here, but having held Tech sessions and written on this really need to comment here. Firstly, what your car "needs" depends entirely on you. The vast majority of people will not even be able to see paint flaws that pop right out at me, nor care if after patiently instructing them on what to look for they finally do notice. This is why the best advice above is to place "DO NOT WASH" signs in all your windows. ("DO NOT TOUCH" should be posted as well!)

Assuming then you're not in the 99.9% and want your car to gleam with perfection from every angle and in any light:

Wash only with either 100% cotton or micro-fiber mitt or towel folded to lay flat (so there are no pressure spots) using straight back an forth (not round and round) motion. Use little or no pressure. Rinse using a stream so that the water rolls off in a sheet leaving little behind to towel off. Do only a small area and rinse the dirt off with the hose before dipping into your deep, full wash bucket.

Clay the car with your detailer (or just spray water) using circular motions with very light pressure. Claying does not remove wax, can be done any time, and phenomenally improves even freshly painted cars.

Polish with a random orbital using Griot's Garage Machine Polish 4 on their orange pad. Polishing removes paint and Machine 4 is the least aggressive and perfect if you are carefully hand washing. Small area, remove with micro-fiber cloth folded to avoid any pressure points on the paint, and never press down hard. Stubborn spots, spray and wipe don't just keep rubbing.

For fanatically awesome results clay again before waxing.

I use all Griot's and love Best of Show wax. Apply with random orbital on orange pad. Remove with micro-fiber cloth, carefully folded and constantly turned to avoid excess rubbing.

Clay again after waxing and you may never want to drive it, it will feel so good to just walk endlessly around enjoying your beauty from every angle. And really, has there ever been a car that looks so beautiful from every angle as the 991? Rhetorical question!
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:56 AM
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Originally Posted by chuck911 View Post
I'm new here, but having held Tech sessions and written on this really need to comment here. Firstly, what your car "needs" depends entirely on you. The vast majority of people will not even be able to see paint flaws that pop right out at me, nor care if after patiently instructing them on what to look for they finally do notice. This is why the best advice above is to place "DO NOT WASH" signs in all your windows. ("DO NOT TOUCH" should be posted as well!)

Assuming then you're not in the 99.9% and want your car to gleam with perfection from every angle and in any light:

Wash only with either 100% cotton or micro-fiber mitt or towel folded to lay flat (so there are no pressure spots) using straight back an forth (not round and round) motion. Use little or no pressure. Rinse using a stream so that the water rolls off in a sheet leaving little behind to towel off. Do only a small area and rinse the dirt off with the hose before dipping into your deep, full wash bucket.

Clay the car with your detailer (or just spray water) using circular motions with very light pressure. Claying does not remove wax, can be done any time, and phenomenally improves even freshly painted cars.

Polish with a random orbital using Griot's Garage Machine Polish 4 on their orange pad. Polishing removes paint and Machine 4 is the least aggressive and perfect if you are carefully hand washing. Small area, remove with micro-fiber cloth folded to avoid any pressure points on the paint, and never press down hard. Stubborn spots, spray and wipe don't just keep rubbing.

For fanatically awesome results clay again before waxing.

I use all Griot's and love Best of Show wax. Apply with random orbital on orange pad. Remove with micro-fiber cloth, carefully folded and constantly turned to avoid excess rubbing.

Clay again after waxing and you may never want to drive it, it will feel so good to just walk endlessly around enjoying your beauty from every angle. And really, has there ever been a car that looks so beautiful from every angle as the 991? Rhetorical question!
Griots is entry level to premium car care stuff. Their orbitals can't compare to other brands and their waxes and polishes aren't that good. But it is better than stuff off the shelf at stores.
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:20 AM
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:03 AM
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"Polishing removes paint" is what every new car owner with a clear coat paint system needs to understand well before they buy into using mechanical devices and polishing compounds. You need to know that it can easily remove your clear coat by grinding it off. So if you have clear coat that is what you should clean and polish- gently. Clay bars are perfect if used properly. Then a wax (of the kind that makes you happy) will provide the sheen and protection of the clear coat. Of course, once the clear coat protection is gone, you can use all sorts of things to repair flaws in pigmented paint.
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Old 10-05-2012, 10:53 AM
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When I ordered my Spyder I instructed them to limit their work to removing the protective cover on the paint and any protectants sprayed on the undercarriage. I instructed them to do nothing more and that is exactly what they did.

When I received the car I could see exactly where the protective wrap ended because a very small amount of glue remained on the paint. I used a very mild finishing polish and a finishing polish pad to remove the glue using a dual action polisher. I also gave the entire body a quick once over to make sure it's perfect. My car arrived in the winter so it wasn't driven for a couple of months but when I finally had it on the road I had a full clear bra installed on the front and near the tires. I waxed with carnauba and just maintain. I haven't polished it since except for the occasional spot polish by hand to remove a surface scratch (usually someone brushing the car at a car show).

The glue should also easily come off with clay and if you're not familiar with the use of a polisher I would stick with the clay.

Congrats on the new ride and enjoy in good health!
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