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997.1 Engine Drop - big list of To Do's

 
Old 07-10-2019, 01:22 PM
  #91  
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Every coolant fitting is suspect. If you drill and tap and screw in a fastener>that just keeps the fitting from rotating and blowing out. From years of seeing the same design on the 996GT3 and 996Turbo the glue bond can fail down the road and seep coolant. Heat the glue up and remove the fittings. Clean, emory cloth and re epoxy. se JB Weld Original formula>>do not get the quick set or Marine. Let the bond/joint cure for at least 12 to 14 hours before drilling/tapping/screwing in the fastener.
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Old 07-10-2019, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Kevin View Post
Every coolant fitting is suspect. If you drill and tap and screw in a fastener>that just keeps the fitting from rotating and blowing out. From years of seeing the same design on the 996GT3 and 996Turbo the glue bond can fail down the road and seep coolant. Heat the glue up and remove the fittings. Clean, emory cloth and re epoxy. se JB Weld Original formula>>do not get the quick set or Marine. Let the bond/joint cure for at least 12 to 14 hours before drilling/tapping/screwing in the fastener.

Kevin - what are your thoughts on what appears to be a reluctance to weld the pipes in. Is there an issue over time with the welds? Is there something about the joint and/or the materials that makes this difficult? I still can't wrap my head around glued in fittings.

Thanks!
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Old 07-10-2019, 02:10 PM
  #93  
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Got it Kevin. Did you look at the first picture? Is that what you meant by locking in the pins?

Ed
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Old 07-10-2019, 02:47 PM
  #94  
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Originally Posted by Rob32Ford View Post
Kevin - what are your thoughts on what appears to be a reluctance to weld the pipes in. Is there an issue over time with the welds? Is there something about the joint and/or the materials that makes this difficult? I still can't wrap my head around glued in fittings.

Thanks!
Agree, If/when I have to deal with this, I was thinking of sending out the whole part and getting them welded in, a la bbi or someone similar.
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Old 07-10-2019, 04:21 PM
  #95  
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The extruded coolant fitting ages over time. You risk a stress crack at the weld line due to the aluminum stress fatigue. Now if you take and CNC T6061 and make new fittings or purchase aftermarket fittings and clean, clean clean the existing casting>>a good welder can weld the new aluminum fitting into the castings. The next step is where 90% of the shop cheat. They don't pressure test there work. Visual inspection and hand the pieces to the shop tech for install. Every year I get PPI calls for recommendations on cars that have coolant seeping around welded (now cracked or thru a pinhole from a contaminated weld) or a pinned stock fitting that wasn't removed and re-epoxied. Welding is NOT 100%.. There risk rises if you do not pressure test and weld new CNC'd fittings. If you weld the STOCK extruded with uneven (thickness) which vary from 0.058" to 0.065" thickness "your" risk goes up due to stress fractures. Who wants to go back in and redo the job when you can glue and pin or weld with new fitting and pressure test!
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Old 07-10-2019, 04:22 PM
  #96  
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Ed, yes you have staked the pin. It will keep the pin from moving around.
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Old 07-10-2019, 09:12 PM
  #97  
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Cool. Another skill added.

Ed
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:36 PM
  #98  
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Going to be dropping my motor this winter. Hoping to get some similar things accomplished
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Old 07-16-2019, 08:55 AM
  #99  
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Originally Posted by Kevin View Post
The extruded coolant fitting ages over time. You risk a stress crack at the weld line due to the aluminum stress fatigue. Now if you take and CNC T6061 and make new fittings or purchase aftermarket fittings and clean, clean clean the existing casting>>a good welder can weld the new aluminum fitting into the castings. The next step is where 90% of the shop cheat. They don't pressure test there work. Visual inspection and hand the pieces to the shop tech for install. Every year I get PPI calls for recommendations on cars that have coolant seeping around welded (now cracked or thru a pinhole from a contaminated weld) or a pinned stock fitting that wasn't removed and re-epoxied. Welding is NOT 100%.. There risk rises if you do not pressure test and weld new CNC'd fittings. If you weld the STOCK extruded with uneven (thickness) which vary from 0.058" to 0.065" thickness "your" risk goes up due to stress fractures. Who wants to go back in and redo the job when you can glue and pin or weld with new fitting and pressure test!

Not even sure why someone would try and weld the old fittings.

BBI makes a set for like 200 bucks.

Welding vs glue/pinning will be discussed until the end of time. What is right? Who knows both work. I like welding over pinning but that is just me.

Find a shop that knows the cars and if they are going to weld make sure they know what they are doing
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Old Yesterday, 05:30 AM
  #100  
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Great job! Enjoyed reading this thread, excellent work.
I am doing similar works on mine at the moment, except I am also having to replace the turbos due to corrosion ;( (UK weather). What if anything do Porsche state should be used when fitting the new orings in the engine?
Both coolant ones and oil system ones. I would usually lube the oil system ones lightly with a bit of engine oil, I guess its the same for the coolant ones?

Anyone got any good info on this. Kevin? I read on an oring makers site that using any type of grease is bad as it will absorb into the oring when the engine is hot and shorten the life of it a lot.
thanks
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Old Yesterday, 08:21 AM
  #101  
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Getting there. Had to wait on Porsche to get the right sealant for the cam covers (part superseded and then restricted to 918's then another part....) Getting it today. Had to use a map torch to get the fittings out, epoxied them and they just finished the 24 hour cure so I will be pinning them tonight or tomorrow.

For the o-rings Porsche says to use a specific grease for the o rings. The part 000.043.204.68 is the one for the o ring grease.

For your turbo's, I have never heard of them rusting. I have heard of the actuators having trouble and either un-seizing them and replacing the arms or just replacing the arms or cleaning them up solve the issue. Are you sure you need to replace them?

Ed
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Old Yesterday, 08:49 AM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by lliejk View Post
Getting there. Had to wait on Porsche to get the right sealant for the cam covers (part superseded and then restricted to 918's then another part....) Getting it today. Had to use a map torch to get the fittings out, epoxied them and they just finished the 24 hour cure so I will be pinning them tonight or tomorrow.

For the o-rings Porsche says to use a specific grease for the o rings. The part 000.043.204.68 is the one for the o ring grease.

For your turbo's, I have never heard of them rusting. I have heard of the actuators having trouble and either un-seizing them and replacing the arms or just replacing the arms or cleaning them up solve the issue. Are you sure you need to replace them?

Ed
Thanks Ed, I believe we have talked on a different thread! where you posted some very helpful pics of your build.
Got that regards the oring grease, thanks a lot.

Where do you live? Corrosion may not be common place in hotter climates but in the UK, where the weather is generally terrible, it is a common issue on 996tt, and more and more on 997tt as well.
My turbo was blowing from between the compressor housing and the turbo centre bit. The corrosion has thinned the metal to the point where the exhaust gas found the weak spot. Now, I could have got them refurbished but bought new. Also, the turbo lines are stuck in the turbos so badly that I am having to replace them... all. So thats all new turbo lines because the old ones are stuck in there so tight.
Here is a few pics.. ! So while I replaced all the turbo lines I decided to go to town on everything and go the while hog so to speak. Cannot wait to get it back together!!



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Old Yesterday, 09:02 AM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by atcbi5 View Post
Ed, great to see other guys doing their own work!!! That return line is the numero uno for coolant leaks! It usually begins as a small leak via the plastic elbow. I believe some movement occurs at that rubber part, it will rupture! The drivers side return line is secured and rarely fails. Replace both of them. Hopefully you purchased the sharkwerks elbows. You are going to need a special glue sealer for the mating of that housing assembly to engine block. If you do not use this glue as outlined in the WM, YOU WILL HAVE VACUUM codes etc.
What special glue sealer for what housing assembly to the engine block?! I am at a similar stage, just have the oil coolers left to remove and the elbows below, can someone elaborate on this? THANKS
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Old Yesterday, 09:09 AM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by theanalyst View Post
What special glue sealer for what housing assembly to the engine block?! I am at a similar stage, just have the oil coolers left to remove and the elbows below, can someone elaborate on this? THANKS

The part where the oil coolers sit and the shark werk elbows bolt into.

That part bolts to the top of the block but using RTV to seal it where the cases meet. I had mine leak the first time I had it off(my fault). I used the approved RTV both times just messed it up the first time.
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Old Yesterday, 09:11 AM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by theanalyst View Post
Great job! Enjoyed reading this thread, excellent work.
I am doing similar works on mine at the moment, except I am also having to replace the turbos due to corrosion ;( (UK weather). What if anything do Porsche state should be used when fitting the new orings in the engine?
Both coolant ones and oil system ones. I would usually lube the oil system ones lightly with a bit of engine oil, I guess its the same for the coolant ones?

Anyone got any good info on this. Kevin? I read on an oring makers site that using any type of grease is bad as it will absorb into the oring when the engine is hot and shorten the life of it a lot.
thanks

I just use rubber safe silicone spray when install o rings. You dont want to use oil as it can make the o rings if they are not meant to have oil on them. It can make them swell over time and leak
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