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What does the "Sport" button do?

 
Old 09-30-2011, 12:17 PM
  #16  
utkinpol
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to change car`s performance you need to alter ECU 'map' of how it adjusts ignition timing basedon current load/gas/air data. sport button only adjusts reaction time/delay to how quick your engine reacts to throttle pedal inputs. in some way it 'increases' performance as car becomes more agile and gets to 100% power output faster but it is same 100% ouput, as usual.

if you do custom ECU tune like softronic - it can also activate your sport mode permanently but also adjusts ECU maps to increase your power output.
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Old 09-30-2011, 01:33 PM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by BHMav8r View Post
So does the "sport mode" make the suspension more "stiff" "sporty" like "sport suspension button/mode" -or- just change when/how PASM intervenes?
PASM doesn't "intervene." Are you conflating PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) with PSM (Porsche Stability Management)?

If a car has Sport Chrono and PASM, then the PASM is also switched to "sport" mode at the same time as you push the "Sport" button, as a convenience to the driver.

You can then, if you choose, push the PASM button to put the suspension back into "Normal" mode (while retaining the other Sport settings).

The two settings are independent, except for the fact that engaging Sport Chrono "Sport" also engages PASM "Sport" with the same button push.

PASM Sport and PASM Normal are unaffected by the presence, absence, or configuration of the Sport Chrono.
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Old 09-30-2011, 02:00 PM
  #18  
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Soo if you dont have PASM, PSE, PDK or Turbo - the sport aftermarket addition doesnt do much - except engage PSM later . . .and change the gas pedal rate?

Just out of curiosity . . .Is it possible to add PASM? Do you have to add the hardware (compute/shocks) and or software -or- are the computer/shocks already there , but need to be activated etc.

Last edited by BHMav8r; 09-30-2011 at 03:36 PM.
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Old 09-30-2011, 05:38 PM
  #19  
No HTwo O
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Originally Posted by BHMav8r View Post
Soo if you dont have PASM, PSE, PDK or Turbo - the sport aftermarket addition doesnt do much - except engage PSM later . . .and change the gas pedal rate?

Just out of curiosity . . .Is it possible to add PASM? Do you have to add the hardware (compute/shocks) and or software -or- are the computer/shocks already there , but need to be activated etc.
You forgot the harder red-line with the "sport button".

I think it would be near impossible and ubber $$$$$$ to retrofil PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) into a non-PASM Porsche. Much cheaper to buy an aftermarket cross-over or like. IMO.
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Old 09-30-2011, 05:59 PM
  #20  
Nugget
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Originally Posted by BHMav8r View Post
Soo if you dont have PASM, PSE, PDK or Turbo - the sport aftermarket addition doesnt do much - except engage PSM later . . .and change the gas pedal rate?
Yeah, pretty much, unless the hard rev-limiter cutoff is important to you.

I'd also argue that even with PASM or PSE the Sport Chrono doesn't really do much, since it doesn't actually add any functions or capabilities that aren't available with PASM or PSE on any car equipped with those features.

Edit to add: it does give you a handful of personalization settings in the computer that you would otherwise have to have your dealer adjust. Like how long the interior lights stay on after you exit the car and whether or not the doors lock when you start driving.
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Old 10-01-2011, 07:15 PM
  #21  
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the buttons vary by model. In the 997.2, the sport button is only for the sports chrono and the button w/ the exhaust tips on it is for the PSE.
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Old 03-21-2015, 03:33 PM
  #22  
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Reviving and old thread . . . I just bought my first Porsche a couple of months ago. It's a 2006 997 base-model Carrera coupe with a manual gearbox, and very few options, but it does have the Sport Chrono package, factory short shifter, and some optional wheels that I like. The car had 59,000 miles on it when I bought it and was in beautiful condition. I bought it from a friend and think I got a pretty good deal. It is my daily driver now. I have several other cars including one that is my track day car, but I really love my 911 and don't know why I waited so long to buy one.

With that introduction, my question is about exactly what the Sport button on the dash does in my car. I read through all the posts in this thread, and am still confused.

Originally Posted by Nugget View Post
To summarize -- in a manual transmission, non-turbo car the sport button does not alter the performance of the car in any measurable way. It doesn't make the car accelerate any faster, turn any sharper, or stop any quicker. It just changes how the car "feels."

. . .

Opinions vary on whether it's a worthwhile feature. I've had it on two 997 cars and I never use it. Some people feel the opposite. Personally, I consider it a mandatory option on a PDK/Tip car or a Turbo, and worse-than-useless otherwise.
That thread in particular has me wondering. What does he mean by "It just changes how the car 'feels.'"? Does the Sport button in a manual gearbox car change how PSM intervenes? (I don't have PASM.) Does it change throttle response in any way? Some of the posters seem to be saying in increases the redline a little. Is that true?

Thanks any input.
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Old 03-21-2015, 04:29 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by Richard EVO View Post
Reviving and old thread . . . I just bought my first Porsche a couple of months ago. It's a 2006 997 base-model Carrera coupe with a manual gearbox, and very few options, but it does have the Sport Chrono package, factory short shifter, and some optional wheels that I like. The car had 59,000 miles on it when I bought it and was in beautiful condition. I bought it from a friend and think I got a pretty good deal. It is my daily driver now. I have several other cars including one that is my track day car, but I really love my 911 and don't know why I waited so long to buy one.

With that introduction, my question is about exactly what the Sport button on the dash does in my car. I read through all the posts in this thread, and am still confused.



That thread in particular has me wondering. What does he mean by "It just changes how the car 'feels.'"? Does the Sport button in a manual gearbox car change how PSM intervenes? (I don't have PASM.) Does it change throttle response in any way? Some of the posters seem to be saying in increases the redline a little. Is that true?

Thanks any input.
Here's some info from the Product Guide:
The Sport Chrono system even affects the engine, by implementing the following features:
• More sporty load cycle behavior • More abrupt high speed cut-off
• More dynamic acceleration pedal characteristic
The Sport Chrono function lends a sportier feel to the transitions between traction and overrun as well as between overrun and traction. This means that injection and ignition are switched on and off more directly when accelerating and particularly when decelerating, resulting in a more spontaneous and dynamic load cycle.
To increase driving comfort a ‘gentler’ cut-off is generally used when accelerating and reaching the speed limiter setting. In the process the throttle is continuously closed when approaching the limit range for speed.
The Sport Chrono function facilitates additional acceleration potential through the use of an abrupt high-speed cut-off by switching off individual cylinders (in- jection and ignition) in a rotating fashion just shortly before the speed limit. The perceptible limit of acceleration lets the driver know if an upshift is executed too late. This allows the driver to learn how to identify the optimum shift point with more accuracy and use the full potential of the engine for acceleration.
When the Sport Chrono button is pressed, the abrupt cut-off is active in 1st to 5th gears for the manual gearbox (without Sport Chrono function only in 1st and 2nd gears) and in the manual gate “M” for Tiptronic transmission.
22
The electronic accelerator pedal (electronic throttle) has been used on the 911 Carrera models since MY 01. With this system, the accelerator pedal position is converted into electrical signals via potentiometers and forwarded as a control signal to the electromechanical throttle via the Motronic control unit. The “conversion” between accelerator pedal angle and throttle angle is performed in the Motronic control unit. Sensitivity and hence driveability in the lower speed and load range are factors here, as is even transmission across the entire pedal or throttle travel.
When the Sport Chrono button is active, a more dynamic accelerator pedal char- acteristic produces a more spontaneous engine response, underpinning the sporty character. This is achieved via a steeper rise for the electronic throttle characteristic by means of a shorter “conversion” between accelerator pedal and throttle angle. This means that the throttle is opened further or faster with the same accelerator pedal travel and selected Sport Chrono function (with Tiptronic S only in the manual “M” position).
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Old 03-21-2015, 04:37 PM
  #24  
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^^^ Thanks! Great info.
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:23 AM
  #25  
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Here's an old Top Gear review of the 2005.

http://www.streetfire.net/video/top-gear-season-5-episode-1-all-rightsbbc-uk_2197327.htm
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Old 03-22-2015, 11:52 AM
  #26  
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I'd like to add one yet-unmentioned aspect...
When my 06 tip C2S is in Sport mode, and I'm just cruising around, when I release the throttle, it feels more like a MT. There's a definite "thud", subtle but I notice it, as the car settles back. In non-sport, de-accel just feels like any other Grand Marquis or Town Car.
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Old 03-23-2015, 03:40 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Chrono View Post
I'd like to add one yet-unmentioned aspect...
When my 06 tip C2S is in Sport mode, and I'm just cruising around, when I release the throttle, it feels more like a MT. There's a definite "thud", subtle but I notice it, as the car settles back. In non-sport, de-accel just feels like any other Grand Marquis or Town Car.
Mechanical or electronic devices used by people have some sort of a “human interface”. A human interface is the way a human interacts with a machine.

Early cars had throttle pedals pulling a cable attached to a cam opening the carburetor butterfly valve. The shape of the pedal cable hook and the shape of the butterfly cam determined the relationship (mathematical function) between the driver’s effort and the engine’s response.

Modern cars’ ‘human interface’ is controlled electronically (drive by wire). The throttle pedal actuates a position sensor (actually two for redundancy) and transmit that electric signal/measurement via the signal bus to an electric motor controlling (i) the intake butterfly valve, (ii) the intake physical length (by opening/closing intake circuit valves), and (iii) fuel injectors. The relationship (mathematical function) between the driver’s effort and the engine’s response is defined digitally and can be changed by modifying the controlling DME software.

PAG introduced drive by wire with the 996 and there were critics of the throttle response. I thought it was fine - direct, responsive with a ‘human’ linear feel. With the 997 PAG offered two drive by wire human interfaces: Normal and (optionally) Sport. All cars came with the Normal interface. The Sport interface was available with the (optional) Sport Chrono (SC) package.

As human interfaces go people interfacing with them have opinions about their performance and here is mine re the 997’s:

The 997 Normal throttle response has a non-linear feel. Low sensitivity with small throttle angles and higher with larger applications. In other words, it is not very responsive. For an analog driver, used to smooth/continuous pedal applications the Normal mode feels very unresponsive.

The 997 Sport mode feels far more linear and responsive/sensitive and should be the default interface - it feels like a good direct/mechanical throttle control. The Normal interface is better left for slow/busy city traffic, as in reality it is very sedate, unless one is a heavy foot (on/off) binary driver.

The Sport button beyond changing the throttle response also stiffens the suspension (PASM) activating PASM Sport, changes PSM stability settings and other parameters. On surfaces where a stiffer suspension is not desired just press the PASM button toggle from PASM Sport to PASM Normal, while maintaining the SC Sport throttle profile.
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Old 03-23-2015, 10:20 AM
  #28  
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Easy, sport button = 50hp+
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Old 03-23-2015, 02:54 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by jets View Post
Easy, sport button = 50hp+
Maybe feels like 50hp+...but Sport mode adds no HP...you're confusing it with the CAI
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