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Gates racing timing belt

 
Old 12-12-2011, 08:31 PM
  #1  
PC-85-928S
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Default Gates racing timing belt

are the blue gates racing timing belts really worth all the extra $$$?
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Old 12-12-2011, 08:34 PM
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Speedtoys
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Depends how much stretchy-stretchy you want in your non blue gates racing timing belt.
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Old 12-12-2011, 09:54 PM
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I'm not running a Gates Kevlar Timing Belt in my 928GT, however I am running one in my 951 Track Car. Virtually indestructible! I didn't mind spending the extra cash to pretty much guarantee no breaking at flank speeds.

As for the 928, a senior 928 Mechanic in Atlanta installed my last timing belt and gears, & recommended I go with an aftermarket hydraulic belt tensioner. He said it was the best piece of mind for a 928.
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Old 12-13-2011, 12:15 AM
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Frankly, the racing belts havent been in the cars long enough to KNOW if they are worth it or not... Give it another 5 years and we'll know FOR SURE. Having said that, I installed one in my 86.5 along with the Porken-tensioner because I dont want to have to do this again for a long time. I'm betting that the racing belt performs as designed... and the new tensioner keeps the slack to a minimum for extended belt life. Its actually a cheap bet considering the amount of time you spend tearing it all down to replace the damn things. If not, well it was worth a shot IMHO. If you go with the standard belt Porsche TB (dont use a Conti - they stretch alot) then you will be doing it again in five years...

Your call
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Old 12-13-2011, 10:47 AM
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Old 12-13-2011, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by PC-85-928S View Post
You are joking right??

If you want the racing timing belt contact Roger at 928's r us he stocks them. That belt on ebay is just a serpentine belt to run accessories.
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Old 12-13-2011, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by jbrob007 View Post
Frankly, the racing belts havent been in the cars long enough to KNOW if they are worth it or not... Give it another 5 years and we'll know FOR SURE. Having said that, I installed one in my 86.5 along with the Porken-tensioner because I dont want to have to do this again for a long time.
This is where the fundamental thinking towards timing belt failure is wrong.

Two things are very consistent with 928's over they years:
1. Belts never fail on their own unless they are really, really old and dry rotted
2. I have yet to hear about a 928 losing a timing belt because the tensioner failed (incorrectly tensioned, maybe).

Your water pump and idler pulley are the same and are the most common failure points that will destroy the timing belt.

The benefit of the stronger timing belt is when your water pump or idler pulley fail, the belt should give you more time to notice the problem (probably due to belt smoke) and shut down the car before it snaps.

Even with the Porken-tensioner & the racing belt, I would still be tearing into the engine every 5 years to service it.

No water pump or idler pulley will last forever, these are the key service items with any timing belt system.

Adding a hydraulic tensioner to the mix only adds another item to service / inspect / replace (just like the stock one). Anyone who has experience with this style of tensioner has seen them fail, and they are supposed to be replaced with the belt at regular intervals.
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Old 12-13-2011, 12:45 PM
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My opinion on "racing" items is they may be fine in that operation but maybe not for everyday long term use. I installed the regular Gates timing belt in my car, I think it was $32. I think the Gates racing belt was something like $137. As someone mentioned, we need more long term data on the racing belt, but it has only been out a short time.
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Old 12-13-2011, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by harborman View Post
My opinion on "racing" items is they may be fine in that operation but maybe not for everyday long term use. I installed the regular Gates timing belt in my car, I think it was $32. I think the Gates racing belt was something like $137. As someone mentioned, we need more long term data on the racing belt, but it has only been out a short time.
I tend to agree with this thinking.

Race cars tend to be serviced much more regularly than 'street' cars and some of the products specified for the racing community are not suitable for street usage. (Things that come to mind are items like race compound tires and brake pads, mounts, copper head gaskets, even practices like running water instead of anti-freeze). Just because racers do it or use it doesn't make it the best choice for your daily driver (that may not see a weekly/monthly teardown and adjustment).

Stick with the Porsche belt or Gates (who makes the belts for Porsche from what I've heard).

I personally use Gates belts on several cars (they make them for everyone) and they are very high quality. I see in the catalog the spiel about the Racing belts is pretty tempting :
From the Gates Catalog:
"Incredibly strong, extremely heat resistant. Tough enough to take the worst pummeling your engine can dish out. No other belts help protect your engine and deliver high performance like Gates Racing Performance Timing Belts.

Yes, the color gives you a hot custom look. But look deeper. Constructed of HNBR elastomeric composites, Gates Racing Performance Timing Belts are 300% stronger than stock belts and deliver up to three times the heat resistance. You can count on them to hold up to the rigors of high horsepower, even with interference engines.":

But (a big but) if you take care of your car 'ON time' you should be just fine with the cheaper OEM style Gates Belt (black).
(and save yourself about 100 bucks).

No belt lasts forever.
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Old 12-13-2011, 02:29 PM
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"even practices like running water instead of anti-freeze"
---
With water wetter, not a problem for a street car..

Nobody runs JUST water, just no glycol.


"No belt lasts forever."
---
What if Amsoil came out with one??
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Old 12-13-2011, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Hacker-Pschorr View Post
This is where the fundamental thinking towards timing belt failure is wrong.

Two things are very consistent with 928's over they years:
1. Belts never fail on their own unless they are really, really old and dry rotted
2. I have yet to hear about a 928 losing a timing belt because the tensioner failed (incorrectly tensioned, maybe).

Your water pump and idler pulley are the same and are the most common failure points that will destroy the timing belt.

The benefit of the stronger timing belt is when your water pump or idler pulley fail, the belt should give you more time to notice the problem (probably due to belt smoke) and shut down the car before it snaps.

Even with the Porken-tensioner & the racing belt, I would still be tearing into the engine every 5 years to service it.

No water pump or idler pulley will last forever, these are the key service items with any timing belt system.

Adding a hydraulic tensioner to the mix only adds another item to service / inspect / replace (just like the stock one). Anyone who has experience with this style of tensioner has seen them fail, and they are supposed to be replaced with the belt at regular intervals.
Saved me 5 minutes, Eric.

That racing belt is a better belt but it's the other stuff that'll usually get you.
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Old 12-13-2011, 03:11 PM
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I remember installing a "racing clutch" in my 1967 Vette 427. It put undo wear on the linkage causing other problems. This was a street machine and my foot got real tired in traffic operating that clutch. I once installed a racing distributor in my 74 Pantera. It lasted several weeks before the shaft broke and left me stranded! Manufacturing defect! I once put an Edlebrock SP2P manifold on my Ford Pick up. In about a year I was getting exhaust in the crank case! The manifold developed a hole in it allowing exhaust gas to leak in the crank case. Sometimes "stock" is the way to go!
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Old 12-13-2011, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by harborman View Post
I remember installing a "racing clutch" in my 1967 Vette 427. It put undo wear on the linkage causing other problems. This was a street machine and my foot got real tired in traffic operating that clutch. I once installed a racing distributor in my 74 Pantera. It lasted several weeks before the shaft broke and left me stranded! Manufacturing defect! I once put an Edlebrock SP2P manifold on my Ford Pick up. In about a year I was getting exhaust in the crank case! The manifold developed a hole in it allowing exhaust gas to leak in the crank case. Sometimes "stock" is the way to go!
Sounds like you got smart and got away from crap American engineering.
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Old 12-13-2011, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by SeanR View Post
Sounds like you got smart and got away from crap American engineering.

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Old 12-14-2011, 12:39 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Speedtoys View Post
"even practices like running water instead of anti-freeze"
---
With water wetter, not a problem for a street car..

Nobody runs JUST water, just no glycol.


"No belt lasts forever."
---
What if Amsoil came out with one??

haha California. We're talking street car vs Racing gates belt.

YMMV. Glycol protects from freezing.
.
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