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Engine knock in 2010 turbo s

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Old 02-10-2018, 02:58 PM
  #16  
lupo.sk
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Originally Posted by 19psi
Hate to tell you this, but you'll be lucky to get 1,000 miles. Most claim that once it starts, it goes downhill fast. Misfires from fouled plugs until the car is no longer driveable..
Mine went from slight knock to engine seized in 5-6kms.
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Old 02-10-2018, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by James1911 View Post
This scares the sh*t out of me.... how can you tell if the cylinders are scored if the car is running perfectly other than getting a scope? The ticking sound can be a number of things, i.e lifters, etc.
Have you woke up in the middle of night yet saying thank God it was only dream?

I bought mine with 50K miles knowing the gamble. I figure if I can put 30K miles on it, I'll be happy and anything after that is bonus...so far I've done 10K. If I had bought a brand new boring car for $30,000, it would devalue far more within the same miles vs what I paid for my Cayenne.

The real kick in the head is that it's not just Cayennes. I'd like to get a 911 or Cayman and have been reading the forums. Scored cylinders seem to be a bigger issue than the IMS failures! Also hearing it's a cold climate issue for them too. Then again, is the whole cold climate thing true when we have Cayenne owners claiming their vehicles have been in warm climates since day one and suffer from scored cylinders?

I'd love to see a class action forcing Porsche to warranty against cylinder scoring on all their cars to 100K miles. Seems fair for both sides.
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Old 02-10-2018, 05:28 PM
  #18  
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At this point - trying the magic goo that Dilberto suggested - can't hurt - might help, might not. Be interesting to find out..
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Old 02-10-2018, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Mackayak View Post
Thanks guys,
I bet you I will be able to put another 100,000 miles on this thing before it blows up!
Philippe
I am not a betting man, but I would take that bet. Sorry to tell you this, but if it is ticking and there is a cylinder scored, the engine is not long for this world. A TTS is putting out crazy amounts of power and torque and will grenade itself even faster once the damage has started. If you are running a tune with a higher boost, it will hasten the engine's demise even faster. Nothing is free, I'm afraid.

I really hope I lose the bet!

Best,
Tom F
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Old 02-17-2018, 08:37 PM
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Old 02-17-2018, 08:40 PM
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Originally Posted by lupo.sk View Post


It happens more in cold climates. ALWAYS wait till the oil temp needle reaches the middle before you step on it. Takes significantly more time than the coolant to warm up.
I wonder how many people follow this rule? and if this is the reason that predisposes the v8's to engine scoring.
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Old 02-19-2018, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by nrddct View Post
I wonder how many people follow this rule? and if this is the reason that predisposes the v8's to engine scoring.
It is a manufacturing defect. Yes, you should always warm up the engine before getting on it. I do not think this is what is causing the failures. Besides, you should be able to start it in -40 temps and run it. They do cold weather proving for this purpose no? I think it is ridiculous that so many of these fail. Don't let anyone tell you it is a rare occurrence...
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Old 03-08-2018, 02:31 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post
At this point - trying the magic goo that Dilberto suggested - can't hurt - might help, might not. Be interesting to find out..
That would be the Liqui Moly Ceratec
Amazon Amazon


It seems that the "Cera" in the name is for ceramic, and this thing is supposed to work by having the tiny ceramic particles in it bond to internal engine surfaces, hardening them, filling in grooves, etc. Sounds great, but so did Slick 50.

I have a 2004 with NO cylinder scoring (see above post for the pre-purchase testing I did) ... detected ... yet ..., but since this seems to be a problem on the V8's in general, I'd like to take any preventive measures I can.

So I bought some of the Ceratec. In hand now, so it will not cost anything more whether I use it or not. So I'm thinking a little now, before putting it in. As long as it does no harm, I'll be happy to use it. I recently did an oil change with Mobil1 0w40, and would just pour it in now. 300ml would still be within spec on oil level.

I've already scanned the intertubes for user testimonials, but am looking for those specific to cylinder scoring prevention in these Cayenne V8's.

Any comments / experiences / advice ?
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Old 03-08-2018, 02:50 PM
  #24  
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As far as the cause.. I wonder if cold starts without complete warmup might be a clue? A car that's used in a cold climate, with short frequent rides where it never gets fully warmed up will experience a rich mixture in the cylinders on startup, which tends to wash the oil off the walls of the cylinder, and possibly oil dilution due to gasoline in the oil. Either of those happening often enough might be enough to start the metal to metal contact.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:05 PM
  #25  
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So my engine knock is getting louder by the week. My brother in law suggested I bring my Porsche to his buddy who has a garage and is a licensed Porche mechanic. He found a major oil leak and diagnosed it as being caused by a failed rod bearing probably caused by driving it without any oil. I assumed that between regular oil changes I would not have to check for oil consumption. Boy was I wrong! My trip to Naples Florida turned out I was using the Turbo a lot more than I thought and at one point I got a red light oil message on the dash saying it was low. At that point apparently it was too late and the damage was done. Anyways to make a long story short I am taking the turbo in next week for a engine rebuild. Estimate is about 14,000.00 provided they find nothing else wrong. So the moral of this story is check your oil after every couple of fill ups and don’t wait for the oil light to come on cause it’s probably too late by then! Will keep you posted when I get the car back at week’s end.
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Old 03-09-2018, 06:02 PM
  #26  
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Almost all of the turbos require oil between changes and on these cars it is not a good idea to drive until the oil light comes on, but it is generally not catastrophic. There are some people who regularly drive and wait until it comes on before they replenish the oil (or drive to the dealer to have them do it) - which you have learned is not the best idea.

It may be a rod bearing, but when you get the rebuild done, I think there is a 99% chance they will find cylinder scoring. What does this rebuild include and how in the world are they performing it in a week?! They must be extremely knowledgeable, talented, well equipped, and are sitting on a stock of some expensive parts, or you are not going to get your car back in a handful of days with a rebuilt engine. Sorry to be a pessimist about that in an already bad situation - just trying to help you out.
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Old 03-09-2018, 06:30 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by nodoors View Post
It may be a rod bearing, but when you get the rebuild done, I think there is a 99% chance they will find cylinder scoring. What does this rebuild include and how in the world are they performing it in a week?! They must be extremely knowledgeable, talented, well equipped, and are sitting on a stock of some expensive parts, or you are not going to get your car back in a handful of days with a rebuilt engine. Sorry to be a pessimist about that in an already bad situation - just trying to help you out.
If I had to guess - it's gonna be a replacement used engine. So, out and in = about a week if you don't have the dealers front end lift (takes engine, transmission, steering, everything forward of the bulkhead out at once..)
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Old 03-10-2018, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Mackayak View Post
So my engine knock is getting louder by the week. My brother in law suggested I bring my Porsche to his buddy who has a garage and is a licensed Porche mechanic. He found a major oil leak and diagnosed it as being caused by a failed rod bearing probably caused by driving it without any oil. I assumed that between regular oil changes I would not have to check for oil consumption. Boy was I wrong! My trip to Naples Florida turned out I was using the Turbo a lot more than I thought and at one point I got a red light oil message on the dash saying it was low. At that point apparently it was too late and the damage was done. Anyways to make a long story short I am taking the turbo in next week for a engine rebuild. Estimate is about 14,000.00 provided they find nothing else wrong. So the moral of this story is check your oil after every couple of fill ups and don’t wait for the oil light to come on cause it’s probably too late by then! Will keep you posted when I get the car back at week’s end.
I suspect that you are going to find scoring, regardless of the diagnosis of a rod bearing. It should be easy to see from the bottom when they open it up to check the rod bearings.

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Old 03-10-2018, 01:27 PM
  #29  
19psi
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If they think it's a rod bearing, that's the last place that needs to be doing your "rebuild".
The dealership you initially brought it to has probably dealt with your issue dozens of times and only needed to confirm with a quick boroscope inspection.
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Old 03-10-2018, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Mackayak View Post
My brother in law suggested I bring my Porsche to his buddy who has a garage and is a licensed Porche mechanic. He found a major oil leak and diagnosed it as being caused by a failed rod bearing probably caused by driving it without any oil.
There are so many things yelling RUN-AWAY in this sentence:

"major oil leak caused by a failed rod bearing"? How does that work? Rod bearings are internal to the engine. Even if they disappeared completely there would be no way for them to create an oil leak.
"licensed Porsche mechanic" - who is doing licensing of Porsche mechanics? Is this a government license? Does Porsche issue licenses? They do give out certificates of training for specific courses the mechanics have attended - but "licensed" - I think not.

I think we'll all be fascinated to hear how the diagnosis changes when the engine is removed and disassembled - unless they're just planning on a replacement engine. Doing a rod bearing if one is destroyed by low oil level and no oil pressure means the other 7 have an equally good chance of failing too.
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