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Banjo bolt instead of coolant bleed screw?

 
Old 09-17-2018, 02:40 PM
  #31  
Dan Martinic
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Ok, I'm thoroughly confused now. How *does* a bleed screw close? Even if you tighten it down, does the little hole in the body not continue to flow liquid out to the end? What's inside the shaft to stop the flow?




In Dave951's suggestion, I assume the **** at the top controls a shut-off device inside the body, correct?
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Old 09-17-2018, 02:51 PM
  #32  
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In the fuel shut off valve the **** side has a rubber seal and needle for flow control. See below.


Last edited by Dave951; 09-17-2018 at 03:23 PM.
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Old 09-17-2018, 02:58 PM
  #33  
Humboldtgrin
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Where is the banjo bolt and fitting like the title states?
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Old 09-17-2018, 02:58 PM
  #34  
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Got it Dave951. Very cool
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Old 09-17-2018, 06:09 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Dan Martinic View Post
Ok, I'm thoroughly confused now. How *does* a bleed screw close? Even if you tighten it down, does the little hole in the body not continue to flow liquid out to the end? What's inside the shaft to stop the flow?




In Dave951's suggestion, I assume the **** at the top controls a shut-off device inside the body, correct?
It seals by the solid point of the bleed screw going into the receiving part. The receiving half has a smaller hole with the same taper. That's why bleed screws are drilled on the side like shown in the picture
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:24 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by mahoney944 View Post
It seals by the solid point of the bleed screw going into the receiving part. The receiving half has a smaller hole with the same taper. That's why bleed screws are drilled on the side like shown in the picture
Ok.. like this then. Now I see. So if the gooseneck had the same "smaller hole" receiving end, it would take a bleeder screw; but it doesn't, so that's that. Dave951's suggestion looks cool though!


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Old 09-18-2018, 01:18 PM
  #37  
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It seems the brake bleed screw idea can work, not as an installed piece but rather as a tool to allow initial fill and purge without having the coolant drool. With a coat or two of locktite thread sealant and a clear hose attached to the fitting and draped in the mouth of the expansion reservoir, one would be able to monitor the amount of escaping air while recycling liquid to the open system. The trick will be, once the system cools, to set the liquid level to be very near the top of gooseneck in order to remove the brake fitting and replace the vent plug without (much) spillage.
As a note, when I fill and purge now, with the nose of the car way up, I pack towels around the gooseneck and I don't leave the vent open after liquid appears. I open the vent a tiny bit, every 30 seconds to release any air collected and close it soon after it gurgles. This works better on NA's than on Turbos and it doesn't make such a mess but goes on for a long time. I'll definitely be experimenting with a purge tube to the tank.
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Old 09-18-2018, 02:14 PM
  #38  
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Am I the only one who has always been fine with the normal bleeder? I always took it for granted.
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Old 09-18-2018, 03:10 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by odonnell View Post
Am I the only one who has always been fine with the normal bleeder? I always took it for granted.
How long do you leave the bleeder open? How much coolant spills over the engine, collecting nicely in the "valley" and on the floor? I have to be esp diligent about the floor: we have 4 cats (plus others in the 'hood) and that stuff is both attractive and poisonous to them!

I wonder how they used to service at the dealer? I can just see about 6 or 7 944s getting bled, spilling coolant all over that pristine dealer concrete floor lol
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Old 09-18-2018, 03:28 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Dan Martinic View Post
...I wonder how they used to service at the dealer? I can just see about 6 or 7 944s getting bled, spilling coolant all over that pristine dealer concrete floor lol
They use drip trays and shop rags and they charge you for the shop rags, I’m not kidding. Seriously though, I use a drip tray whenever I open fluids and I always wipe up spills as I go along, doesn’t everyone?
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Old 09-18-2018, 05:04 PM
  #41  
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Drip tray? They must be massive! When I'm bleeding coolant, it's like pouring water on the peak of a mountain; it doesn't exactly form a nice puddle in one spot at the bottom.

Ah yes.. "shop supplies". Like the 100% mark-up on parts, kinda makes sense. More so after I learn & finish a job myself
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Old 09-18-2018, 05:11 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by odonnell View Post
Am I the only one who has always been fine with the normal bleeder? I always took it for granted.
dont you know that the amount of hoses coming off an engine is directly proportional to its power output?
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Old 09-18-2018, 08:00 PM
  #43  
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Coolants that are store bought in 1 gallon containers have a chemical in them to detour animals from drinking it, however coolants that are bought in 50 or 55 gallon container like dealerships get does not. But cleanup is easy, water washes it all away and will evaporate.
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Old 09-18-2018, 09:01 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Humboldtgrin View Post
Coolants that are store bought in 1 gallon containers have a chemical in them to detour animals from drinking it, however coolants that are bought in 50 or 55 gallon container like dealerships get does not. But cleanup is easy, water washes it all away and will evaporate.
The addition of denatonium benzoate as a bittering agent helps but the antifreeze is still toxic to the animals if they are inclined to drink enough of it.
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