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Removing oil cooler lines SOLVED

 
Old 02-19-2014, 10:11 PM
  #16  
Adamant1971
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Originally Posted by GlenL View Post
Take them to Pirtek and have the hose replaced and real collets put on. Like $40.
I found a local shop in Oakville that can do exactly that. Now I just need to pull the rad and the lines.
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Old 02-19-2014, 10:40 PM
  #17  
James Bailey
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Pay attention to the clocking of the fittings as it can make it very hard to install the rebuilt hose....
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Old 02-19-2014, 11:51 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Lizard928 View Post
Push-Lok hose (model 801) made by Parker (different models hose available), has a temperature rating from -40F to 257f rating. http://ph.parker.com/us/15551/en/pus...rpose-hose-801

Their 836 hose is rated for temps from -55F to 302F

The rating that you are refering to Greg is their "Maximum Working Temperature Air (F) of 212" on their 836 hose. But they state, "Maximum Working Temperature Oil (F) of 302" for this hose.

So they are both well within useage specs for the 928 engine hoses. If you are seeing even the 257F that the 801 is rated to, you really need to add an additional oil cooler and get those temps down.

Most oils, engine, hydraulic etc. work best between 180-220F above that they start to break down. If you exceed 240F on most oils, they should be replaced before further use according to most manufactures. Though I do not have the evidence/personal experience with oils that have breached 240F to say yay or nay to that.
I'm not referring to Parker hose, at all.

Just making the point that neither Aeroquip nor Goodridge hose is rated above the temperatures that 928 engines have commonly, in their oil pans. I have no idea what Parker says in their specification.

And down here, where summer temperatures can reach over 100 degrees, with stop and go traffic, the oil in the pan will frequently be over 275 degrees. (Keep in mind that the very hot oil is pumped from the pan to the cooler....in order to cool that oil down....so at least one of the hoses is exposed to oil that is the same temperatures...or hotter....than that in the pan.)

My statement stands....be careful what you pick out to do a task.

And be realistic in what you are attempting.....one doesn't need to be very smart to figure this stuff out.

If Porsche thought Pushloc hose with hose clamps was adequate for the job....that's what would be on the car....right?
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Old 02-20-2014, 02:07 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by GregBBRD View Post
If Porsche thought Pushloc hose with hose clamps was adequate for the job....that's what would be on the car....right?


sure that's why the GTS crankcase system is so great right........
By that analogy no one should buy your fuel hoses.

What is acceptable, what is cosmetically pretty, what is the easiest to do for manufacturing, and what will make/save a company the most money are most times never the same thing.
Is a swedge better than a gearclamp, absolutely, no arguing that. It's also substantially faster than tightening a clamp on each and every one. But that doesn't mean that a clamp cannot do the job more than adequately. A dual clamp setup will hold more than acceptably at the pressures we are going to be seeing.
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Old 02-21-2014, 02:28 AM
  #20  
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Success, rad pulled and lines out. A little messy, but now I can do more engine bay cleaning with the rad out.

The metal ends spin freely in the collar and rubber hose, they were leaking pretty good.

Off to the rebuilder tomorrow.

Pulling the rad made it an easy affair.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:23 AM
  #21  
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I got the lines re-built today by Fluid Line. I just need to clean up the metal fittings before they go back in. $86 to do both lines.

I marked the fittings for proper placement before they re-built them and everything looks good. The old ones were sure loose.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:56 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Adamant1971 View Post
I got the lines re-built today by Fluid Line. I just need to clean up the metal fittings before they go back in. $86 to do both lines.

I marked the fittings for proper placement before they re-built them and everything looks good. The old ones were sure loose.
I'm glad that it's working out OK. Thank you for documenting it.
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Old 02-22-2014, 02:36 AM
  #23  
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before you fit the new lines,
add some anti seize to the threads,
and the rear of ball seat flange that the B nut will bear on,
this will prevent the B nut from seizing on the fitting
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Old 01-08-2019, 08:23 PM
  #24  
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Doing this job now myself. How can I counterhold the top fitting on the block? It's blocked by the lower fitting. I can't even get a 27mm crow's foot or channellocks in there. Tried every angle. And there is some kind of hex plug just above the top fitting blocking it from above. Should I remove that? It's some oddball size, like 30mm. Maybe I can find an ultra low-profile crow's foot, but failing that I'm kind of stuck. Is it a terrible idea to jam something in between the upper and lower fitting and just counterhold the lower one?
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:26 PM
  #25  
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did you remove the alternator and oil filter? Do you have some knipix flat jaw pliers 10 or 12 inch are good for this job
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:17 PM
  #26  
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Those fittings should have Red Locktite from the factory and should not budge when removing the oil line fittings. At least that's been my experience.
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:34 PM
  #27  
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I use bicycle wrenches, they are nice and thin. But as Stan mentioned you need to get other stuff out of the way.
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:13 PM
  #28  
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OK, I got the hose out. Yeah, the alternator and filter were removed. But I still don't see how anyone does it with the proper tools. Bicycle wrenches are thin, but I needed something with a smaller outside radius. But I found I could get my channellocks open wide just enough to grab both upper and lower fittings together to counterhold the fitting on the block. Maybe my problem was that the upper fitting was clocked so that a point of the hex was pointing directly at the bottom fitting, so I couldn't fit anything in between. I notice the other fittings are clocked so that a flat is facing down, so maybe that's how they're supposed to be from the factory.

The only problem is the fitting did rotate a little. Actually it rotated a little too easily, so I guess the loctite was already broken. Only rotated a few degrees, but it could be a problem. Maybe somebody messed with it before me and gave up when the fitting rotated. I think I'll just put it back together with the rebuilt hose and see if it leaks, since it wasn't too hard to take it apart except for that upper fitting.
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Old 01-11-2019, 10:38 PM
  #29  
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if the fitting is loose,
now would be the time to remove the fitting and clean the threads and use fresh GREEN loctite to install it.
NOTE heating the fitting first with a small torch will soften the old loctite
250 degrees F is a good number to use.
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Old 01-12-2019, 01:55 AM
  #30  
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OK, I just realized I can easily get a socket on that stupid fitting now that the hose is out. There's several different varieties of the green Loctite now. I'm guessing it's 290 since that specifies it seals threaded parts?

Looks like there's also a crush ring I should replace.
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