Notices
928 Forum
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by: 928 Specialists

Overhaul of waterpump DIY

 
Old 06-20-2012, 02:15 PM
  #31  
WallyP

Rennlist Member
Rennlist Site Sponsor

 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 6,469
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

I would have drilled along the shaft axis at the intersection of the shaft and impeller, tapped the blind hole, and installed (with threadlocker) an Allen setscrew to ensure that the impeller never moves.
WallyP is offline  
Old 06-21-2012, 04:57 AM
  #32  
Bart-Jan
User
Thread Starter
 
Bart-Jan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: The Nertherlands
Posts: 253
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

I would have drilled along the shaft axis at the intersection of the shaft and impeller, tapped the blind hole, and installed (with threadlocker) an Allen setscrew to ensure that the impeller never moves.
Too late! The pump was all ready fitted and the cambelt is on (with porkensioner). Anyway, I think one would need quite an impressive press to take the impellor off with the deforming of the end of the shaft.

The car's all ready driven 200 km without any issues! I kept the left upper cambelt cover off, to be able to see part of the pump to check it at the beginning and end of every run. The axis is spinning nicely, without any noises, no water drops, no overheating and no other loss of coolant.

So for the moment, I'm very happy with the end result!
Bart-Jan is offline  
Old 06-21-2012, 07:54 AM
  #33  
PHIL928
User
 
PHIL928's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Dubai, UAE. Oxford UK during semester.
Posts: 557
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

It will be good to see how this pump gets on, make sure you update us once in a while!
PHIL928 is offline  
Old 06-21-2012, 09:38 AM
  #34  
depami
Super User
 
depami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Cleveland, MN
Posts: 2,369
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Very interesting and kudos to you.

Now, how much did you spend? It would appear that you got some free machining. What would it cost to hire that machining?

Hope it works good for you.

Cheers
depami is offline  
Old 06-21-2012, 10:19 AM
  #35  
WallyP

Rennlist Member
Rennlist Site Sponsor

 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 6,469
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

It has been interesting to see the responses in this thread. There seem to be two types of people (those who divide people into types and those who don't) - those who think that the only reasonable action is replacement with a new part ASAP and as cheaply as possible, and those (mostly old farts like me) who love to fix things. The replacers never understand the fixers...

I love the DIY rebuild!
WallyP is offline  
Old 06-21-2012, 12:52 PM
  #36  
Bill Ball
Under the Lift
Lifetime Rennlist
Member
 
Bill Ball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Buckeye, AZ
Posts: 18,482
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Oh, I love it too. This thread showed me there is no way I could do this.
Bill Ball is offline  
Old 06-23-2012, 08:07 AM
  #37  
Bart-Jan
User
Thread Starter
 
Bart-Jan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: The Nertherlands
Posts: 253
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Thanks for the Kudos, guys!
The total rebuild has cost me something like 70 Euros: 60 for the bearings and oil seal. 10 for the water seal and some new nuts and bolts.

I made the parts on the lathe at my work. Material was available, so didn't cost me anything

I always find it interesting to find cheap ways of fixing things and when possible even improving over the old design. To me, it's not needed to keep everything original, so Fiat and Ford parts are fine to me! And so is full DIY...

I'll keep you guys updated of the lifetime of the waterpump!
Bart-Jan is offline  
Old 06-23-2012, 05:43 PM
  #38  
dcrasta
User
 
dcrasta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Washington "Dc"
Posts: 1,810
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bart-Jan View Post
Thanks for the Kudos, guys!
The total rebuild has cost me something like 70 Euros: 60 for the bearings and oil seal. 10 for the water seal and some new nuts and bolts.

I made the parts on the lathe at my work. Material was available, so didn't cost me anything

I always find it interesting to find cheap ways of fixing things and when possible even improving over the old design. To me, it's not needed to keep everything original, so Fiat and Ford parts are fine to me! And so is full DIY...

I'll keep you guys updated of the lifetime of the waterpump!



I wish I had machinist skills. Well done sir
dcrasta is offline  
Old 08-15-2012, 05:56 AM
  #39  
Bart-Jan
User
Thread Starter
 
Bart-Jan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: The Nertherlands
Posts: 253
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

I promissed to keep you all updated on my waterpump.
I don't use my Shark every day (fuel prices are tremendous!!!), but despite this, I've done about 1000 km's with it since I installed it. We've had a bad summer here in The Netherlands, but still there were some days of +30 degrees Celcius. I've used the car @ 160 km/hour on the highway and came to a halt in a short traffic jam. Both fans switched on quickly, and the pump is still going strong! Quite a test, I would say. So I'm still happy with the repair. Just to let you know that it can be done (with some engineering skills)
Bart-Jan is offline  
Old 08-15-2012, 07:54 AM
  #40  
mickster
Super User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 3,719
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bart-Jan View Post
Thanks for the Kudos, guys!
The total rebuild has cost me something like 70 Euros: 60 for the bearings and oil seal. 10 for the water seal and some new nuts and bolts.

I made the parts on the lathe at my work. Material was available, so didn't cost me anything

I always find it interesting to find cheap ways of fixing things and when possible even improving over the old design. To me, it's not needed to keep everything original, so Fiat and Ford parts are fine to me! And so is full DIY...

I'll keep you guys updated of the lifetime of the waterpump!
Having access to the lathe certainly helps! The cost of a good lathe alone would pay for a new pump

What size is the needle bearing?

I will tell you why I ask in my reply.
mickster is offline  
Old 08-16-2012, 04:16 AM
  #41  
Bart-Jan
User
Thread Starter
 
Bart-Jan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: The Nertherlands
Posts: 253
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

The needle bearing has an outer diameter of 30 mm.
There's a huge increase of bearing surface and therefore increase of max. allowed load on them.

Now, I wonder why you asked;-)
Bart-Jan is offline  
Old 06-09-2016, 12:19 AM
  #42  
slate blue
Addict
Rennlist Member

 
slate blue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 3,295
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Bart-Jan,

I just read your thread, would you like to update us again.

Cheers

Greg
slate blue is offline  
Old 06-09-2016, 07:36 AM
  #43  
Dave928S
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Dave928S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tasmania, Australia
Posts: 4,586
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

^^ I'd also like to hear an update on what was an excellent rebuild.
Dave928S is offline  
Old 06-09-2016, 10:25 AM
  #44  
Chris Lockhart
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Chris Lockhart's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Taylors, S.C.
Posts: 2,096
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Originally Posted by slate blue View Post
Bart-Jan,

I just read your thread, would you like to update us again.

Cheers

Greg

Ditto. IMHO if you have the skills and equipment, go the DIY route.

He mentioned on page one that if it failed he was going with an electric water pump. I've been wondering about the possibility of removing the WP from the system, and in it's stead have a plate with a regular pulley to keep the belt properly routed/tensioned. Then run a remotely mounted electric water pump. Just idle mental figuring when I'm bored. LOL .
Chris Lockhart is offline  
Old 06-09-2016, 11:14 AM
  #45  
dr bob
Chronic Tool Dropper
Lifetime Rennlist
Member
 
dr bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Bend, Oregon
Posts: 17,999
Received 13 Likes on 12 Posts
Default

External electric pumps always sound like a good idea, and may be on some cars like SBC with distinct in and out fittings against the block. Consider the 928 coolant circulation with the thermostat as bypass, and how you'd connect the coolant piping between pump and block. [scratches head...]

My car has a 928 International rebuilt that was removed and inspected at its only belt change since installation. Looked fine felt fine, went back in fine with new Porsche gasket. Maybe I got the last good one.

Mechanical seal failure is sometimes caused by fluid contamination, which allows particles of crud to scratch the face of the mechanical seal. The Most Common Killer of these seals though is running them dry. It takes only a short bit of dry operation to overheat the ceramic and cause it to crack. You can run the seal dry with a full system if you have air or steam bubbles. The seal, while it will run OK with just water, loves a bit of lubrication. Coolants have this, and it also comes in product like Water Wetter. Keep good coolant in the car at all times to keep rust from forming on exposed steel parts in the system, and you'll be ahead of the two most common failure modes.
dr bob is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Overhaul of waterpump DIY


Contact Us - About Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: