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86.5 engine fire

 
Old 03-15-2019, 01:17 PM
  #1  
rexpontius
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Unhappy 86.5 engine fire

Hi guys,

Yesterday I took my 86.5 out of storage to get it inspected and back on the road for this season.
Car started right up and drove perfectly.

About 1 mile before the inspection station I was at the stop-light waiting when the engine started to stumble, a couple of seconds later there was a fuel smell and shortly after a loud pop and orange flames.....
Fortunately I was able to get off the main road, and get out of the car.
Tried to extinguish the fire with a small extinguisher I have in all of my cars, but it was no use against the fire.

Fortunately the fire fighters arrived very quickly, so the car is not totally toasted.
Have to decide yet what to do with it next (repair or dismantle).

No clue what happened, the fuel lines were all changed ~3yrs back....

I did make the local news...:

https://www.112noordholland.nl/regio...ge-in-cruquius
https://www.112meerlanden.nl/2019/03...kruisweg-n201/

Will make more pics this week-end.

cheers
Michel
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:44 PM
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Jason89s4
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Wow. So sorry to hear that. First, at least you are okay.
Did you happen to take a peak and look and see what area of the engine bay the fire started? (Which area looked the most melted/burned?)
Not that it is any consolation, I've seen worse than that be re-furbished.
Jason
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:54 PM
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dr bob
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I'm very sorry for your loss. Nobody ever wants to see their car, home or loved ones as a headline feature for the evening news. Good that you are OK.

----

There's a lesson buried in here somewhere. It may be that we need to diligently check for fuel leaks every spring before driving cars that hibernate. Follow the same protocol we do after changing fuel lines. jumpering the fuel pump relay with a switched jumper, then doing a sniff test at all the flex line locations.

My biggest worry used to be mice eating the under-hood wiring and insulation while the car is stored. That concern will now share high priority with hoses and other soft materials under the hood.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:10 PM
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Very sad to see this.

On the bright side, as far as fires go, that looks very repairable.

Originally Posted by dr bob View Post
There's a lesson buried in here somewhere. It may be that we need to diligently check for fuel leaks every spring before driving cars that hibernate. Follow the same protocol we do after changing fuel lines. jumpering the fuel pump relay with a switched jumper, then doing a sniff test at all the flex line locations.
That's what I do before spring start-up. Physically reach down and move the lines around. A small pinhole leak may hold at first.....

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Old 03-15-2019, 02:12 PM
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vanster
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I have PTSD just thinking about it let alone looking at the pics of your car. I can feel it and smell it. You are very lucky. It's not all that bad. Few parts are really hard to find, such as the intake tubes, start looking now.
Chance to repaint your car, I know just what you were thinking about before the fire.
Not sure if you have the rat problem like some of us do as Dr Bob suggest. You will be able to find the root cause once you get past the smell.
Welcome to the club, you have to save it! You will be glad you did. Another 928 with a story to tell...
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:11 PM
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rexpontius
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Thanks

The car was jus fully restored and fully repainted (windows out and all....)
Just very bad luck I guess....
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:19 PM
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So, sorry for this misfortune.
Originally Posted by dr bob View Post
I... Follow the same protocol we do after changing fuel lines. jumpering the fuel pump relay with a switched jumper, then doing a sniff test at all the flex line locations.

My biggest worry used to be mice eating the under-hood wiring and insulation while the car is stored. That concern will now share high priority with hoses and other soft materials under the hood.
Mr. Bob, after changing fuel lines...can't just turn on the switch to position 2 and hear the Fuel Pump turn on to see if fuel is leaking from fuel lines instead of using a switched jumper? The reason why I ask this is because I just changed my lines and used position 2 and there were no leaks. thanks

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Old 03-15-2019, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by frugal928 View Post
So, sorry for this misfortune.


Mr. Bob, after changing fuel lines...can't just turn on the switch to position 2 and hear the Fuel Pump turn on to see if fuel is leaking from fuel lines instead of using a switched jumper? The reason why I ask this is because I just changed my lines and used position 2 and there were no leaks. thanks
Our cars do not prime the fuel system when turning the key to the run position. The pump only runs when the computers see a crank speed signal indicating the engine is turning.

with out cranking the car the only way to pressurize the fuel system is to force the pump to run (i.e. jumper the relay).
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:43 PM
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Sorry to hear. Hope you can bounce back from this.
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:44 PM
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Thank you so much for your response and the education
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:55 PM
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Welcome to the 928 engine fire club!

Mine was due to a leaking fuel rail gauge. Lots of folks removed theirs after my incident.
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Old 03-15-2019, 04:13 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by rexpontius View Post
Thanks

The car was jus fully restored and fully repainted (windows out and all....)
Just very bad luck I guess....

Sorry to hear about this, especially after all the work you must have put into it.

If you decide to bring it back and need any parts let me know. I have my daily driver 85 S3 that I got T-boned in, that will eventually get dismantled. Smashed every panel on the right side, but the engine bay was untouched.
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Old 03-15-2019, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by rexpontius View Post
Thanks

The car was jus fully restored and fully repainted (windows out and all....)
Just very bad luck I guess....
Menheer Michel,

Very sad to read of your loss- you must be gutted. Perhaps I can suggest you take some pics around the area underneath where the bonnet was burnt through. The obvious prime suspects are the two fuel lines under that general location. We also had an incident recently reported caused by an electrical fault in that general area but I doubt that will prove to be the issue as the engine was running and presumably kept running until you pulled over and switched it off

That you replaced the fuel lines three years ago and presumably have covered some mileage with them is also a bit more puzzling.

Whatever the cause we sure feel for you. Losing a 928 is a most unpleasant experience irrespective of how it was caused.

I would also endorse the concept of precautions when starting the car after a longish interval out of use. There is a lot to be said for circulating fuel under pressure before cranking the motor and firing it up. Just run the pump for a minute or two and then look for any signs of leaks- try to have a hose standing by with water running and have a helper with you if possible. Over the years we have sadly seen quite a few of these cars go up in smoke and Van's is an excellent example of what can be done- a true Phoenix that rose from the ashes of his horrific fire incident.

Do try to keep us updated as to what you find in due course- you will get lots of positive inputs from the chaps.
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Old 03-15-2019, 05:19 PM
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dr bob
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For those playing along, a switched jumper with a longish tail on it is perfect for this and other fuel leak tests, or to get the car home when a fuel pump or other critical relay fails. Being able to switch off the pump when a leak is discovered, watching a fuel pressure decay test of regulators dampers injectors and check valves, or looking for leaks around the pump area after changing a pump or filter -- all are easier and safer if you can turn the pump off right from where you are working.

Checking for leaks on purpose is also a LOT safer when the engine is still cold. Leaks are easier to find, and much less likely to flash on their own on a hot part like the exhaust.
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Old 03-15-2019, 06:39 PM
  #15  
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Verdorie, Michel, dat is rot voor je!

And back into English: glad you are OK, and hope you will save it and bring it back.
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