Notices

987 Spyder - collectiable ?

 
Old 04-13-2019, 01:10 PM
  #1  
DK7
User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 446
Default 987 Spyder - collectiable ?

Hi,

do you think 987 Spyder value increase next 2-4 years ?
If 718 Spyder is NA 4.0L and produced in high numbers.

Bye
DK7 is online now  
Old 04-13-2019, 02:17 PM
  #2  
Marine Blue
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Marine Blue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 13,923
Default

Originally Posted by DK7 View Post
Hi,

do you think 987 Spyder value increase next 2-4 years ?
If 718 Spyder is NA 4.0L and produced in high numbers.

Bye
By now the next iteration of the Spyder won’t have much of an impact on the 987 Spyder since they are completely different approaches. I also doubt Porsche will build more than 2000 copies of the 718/981.2 Spyder with about 800 coming to the US.

With so few 987 Spyders in existence, their good looks, incredible handling and reliability it’s inevitable that eventually they will go up in value and that trend has already started. Having said that, it’s hard to predict how soon that will happen.
Marine Blue is offline  
Old 04-13-2019, 04:10 PM
  #3  
crossroads
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 234
Default

I certainly hope not. And this is coming from a 987 Spyder owner.

Why would I say that? Because when people start to think that Porsches are collectible, it starts to bring in the speculators and flippers. Or the guys who just buy one to add to their collection. And the guys(and gals) who want to just drive and actually work on their cars get priced out of the market. Also, I know for myself, if I think that my car is “collectible” I may start treating it differently. I may get paranoid to drive it because it may lose value if something happens. I know this may be a generalization but I saw it happen to the 993 market. Sad really.
crossroads is offline  
Old 04-13-2019, 04:10 PM
  #4  
DK7
User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 446
Default

Porsche will produce 718 Spyder how much People want, nothing rare or limitied.
DK7 is online now  
Old 04-13-2019, 04:42 PM
  #5  
John McM
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
John McM's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Auckland, New Zealand.
Posts: 11,832
Default

I have just purchased a 2010 987 Spyder so I can add some of my thought process.

1993 Turbo 3.6 - kept for 13 years and sold for 50% more than I paid, but a push over those years for the various costs and value of the dollars received
2001 996 Turbo - sold for a loss
2005 Cayenne - steadily depreciating
1990 964 C4 - possibly close to keeping its real value but my labour is free
1990 964 C4 - sold for a slight profit if I value my labour at $5 per hour
2012 Cayman R - sold for a slight loss after maintenance costs
1999 Boxster - steadily depreciating.

So so this is my 8th Porsche. Things I have learned.
1. A car is not an investment, but some hold their value better than others
2. The ones that hold their value have the X factor, limited supply and/or few substitutes, plus a buyer segment that has the $ to spend.
3. The private market trend is a good indicator of future values as people are spending their own, not company money.
4. The general economy has a bearing on values as toys flourish when money is circulating. Not so much when in recession.

Putting my 987 Spyder purchase through the above. They have already shown that they hold their value well, have the X factor and few substitutes. What we don’t know is whether a buyer will see it the same way in 2 years time, especially if the economy tanks.

I could have bought a later model normal 981 or 718 for the same money, paid 21% more to have a 987 Spyder with 30,000 fewer miles or paid 95% more for a low mileage 781 Spyder. My value judgement is right for me now, but I have no sense as to what it will be in two years time. I doubt I would have jumped to a newer car unless the price was right.
John McM is offline  
Old 04-13-2019, 08:13 PM
  #6  
n4v4nod
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
n4v4nod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,709
Default

Originally Posted by DK7 View Post
Hi,

do you think 987 Spyder value increase next 2-4 years ?
If 718 Spyder is NA 4.0L and produced in high numbers.

Bye
Most definitely... the 981 and 982 are no longer about lightweight, pure, raw fun. That and the fact that it was produced in low numbers. There is nothing like it on the market nor will there be in the near future. Bummed Porsche has abandoned the true/real less is more philosophy.
n4v4nod is offline  
Old 04-13-2019, 09:04 PM
  #7  
fast1
Super User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,387
Default

Originally Posted by John McM View Post
I have just purchased a 2010 987 Spyder so I can add some of my thought process.

1993 Turbo 3.6 - kept for 13 years and sold for 50% more than I paid, but a push over those years for the various costs and value of the dollars received
2001 996 Turbo - sold for a loss
2005 Cayenne - steadily depreciating
1990 964 C4 - possibly close to keeping its real value but my labour is free
1990 964 C4 - sold for a slight profit if I value my labour at $5 per hour
2012 Cayman R - sold for a slight loss after maintenance costs
1999 Boxster - steadily depreciating.

So so this is my 8th Porsche. Things I have learned.
1. A car is not an investment, but some hold their value better than others
2. The ones that hold their value have the X factor, limited supply and/or few substitutes, plus a buyer segment that has the $ to spend.
3. The private market trend is a good indicator of future values as people are spending their own, not company money.
4. The general economy has a bearing on values as toys flourish when money is circulating. Not so much when in recession.

Putting my 987 Spyder purchase through the above. They have already shown that they hold their value well, have the X factor and few substitutes. What we don’t know is whether a buyer will see it the same way in 2 years time, especially if the economy tanks.

I could have bought a later model normal 981 or 718 for the same money, paid 21% more to have a 987 Spyder with 30,000 fewer miles or paid 95% more for a low mileage 781 Spyder. My value judgement is right for me now, but I have no sense as to what it will be in two years time. I doubt I would have jumped to a newer car unless the price was right.
I've owned four 911s over the decades, and currently own a 2013 981S. I've kept each of my Porsches for at least seven years and kept my 993 for ten years. I intend keeping my 981S for at least another four years. The best I've done financially is with my 993. I was able to sell it for just a few thousand less than what I paid, not counting for inflation. In my case I always bought new, maintained the car according to Porsche's recommendations, and sold my cars in private sales. If you do that it's surprising how inexpensive a 911 is when the expenses are spread over 7 +years.

As to buying an appreciating in value Porsche, you would need a crystal ball, unless of course you were wealthy enough to buy a numbered car at MSRP. The closest chance I had was with a Porsche GT. I've always bought my Porsches from the same dealer, so when a GT order was cancelled by the buyer, the sales manager called and offered me the car for MSRP which was a tad over $400K. If I had that crystal ball I would have written the check, but I just felt more comfortable with $400K in mutual funds than in a car.
fast1 is offline  
Old 04-13-2019, 10:46 PM
  #8  
john weires
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
john weires's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Estes Park, Colorado
Posts: 622
Default

It's just a guess so somebody could start a poll on whether the value will stay about the same, go up, or go down over the next two years. My two cents is stay about the same if it's a lower mileage car where as cars driven more will depreciate further. The economy is a factor as well. BTW I own a 2011 Spyder, so full disclosure.
john weires is offline  
Old 04-14-2019, 01:37 AM
  #9  
skl
Official Wednesday AM Red Bull F1 test driver
Rennlist Member
 
skl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Scottsdale 3/4, Des Moines 1/4
Posts: 7,710
Default

Maybe I'm in the minority but I have never purchased a Porsche with the idea of making money with it. I bought it to drive it, wax it, wash it, and look at it... if it goes up in value great. Usually, a few years later, after I've sold it, I wish I never had! ( for example, the real '71 6, the '95 993 coupe with all the right options, etc etc etc).

I got my 981 spyder because I was afraid I wouldn't be able to get another NA car with 3 pedals...
skl is offline  
Old 04-14-2019, 10:24 AM
  #10  
JPMD
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
JPMD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Boca Raton, FL
Posts: 642
Default

I think this post based on title and then the initial post really asks 2 questions about the 987 Spyder.

1. Collectable?
2 Increase value 1-2 years?

My opinion is collectable yes however the definition of this may vary widely. I think the 987 Spyder is special. It is the first iteration of the Boxster Spyder. So much went into achieving the goal of the car being ultimate drivers roadster, looks and weight savings including parts unique to the Spyder i.e. wheels, aluminum doors, LWB, raked windshield and the top which was also functional and not just a design piece. Production numbers not ultra low but for manual and LWB maybe low enough.
The way I define collectable is would this be a car a true Porsche collector would want in his/her garage or if a Powerball winner wanted to start the ultimate Porsche collection money no object would they want/need this specific model. My answer is "yes". The poor man's answer for collectable is what other car for 55K-65K will combine looks, performance, price, exclusivity, importance to car manufacturer ?

As far as going up in value in 1-2 years my guess is it will hold value and maybe go up a bit assuming no major changes in economy etc however after taxes, money to address some issues a used car may have, insurance, shipping etc like most cars it will lose a little or if lucky break even
JPMD is offline  
Old 04-14-2019, 10:39 AM
  #11  
hf1
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
hf1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Northeast
Posts: 4,682
Default

There’s already a substantial “collectibility” aura about the 987 Spyder. In my view, it’s nowhere near 3x better than my 987.1 S (if at all) as market prices seem to suggest. At the level where I got my 987.1, I could drive it into the ground over the next five years and still feel that I’ve come ahead in terms of smiles/$ vs any other sports car out there. Once a thing becomes a “collectible” it starts to own you vs the other way around.

And don’t even start me about the PITA manual top...
hf1 is offline  
Old 04-14-2019, 11:04 AM
  #12  
andy7777
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 226
Default

I think there are some production cars around which a weirdness vortex is created, like the BMW 1M, that causes people to pay sticker or a bit more years after the fact. It's not that the car is objectively 3X better than its cousin, like the 135i, it's that you can't get it anymore and its got a cool factor.

I actually don't think th Spyder will be much more valuable in a few years, there are too many of them, too many with automatic transmissions, and the top eliminates half the country plus half the track days. Look at the price trends on the Cayman R, same pattern of slow depreciation except for the best specced ones.
andy7777 is offline  
Old 04-14-2019, 11:59 AM
  #13  
ToasterThief
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 362
Default

God I hope not. I'm picking mine up next weekend and I'd hate to feel bad driving it.
ToasterThief is offline  
Old 04-14-2019, 12:18 PM
  #14  
garfunkle
User
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 489
Default

Things like this don’t help:

garfunkle is offline  
Old 04-14-2019, 02:02 PM
  #15  
Marine Blue
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Marine Blue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 13,923
Default

I think many are completely excluding rarity when looking at any of these cars. The 89 Speedster is a very good example of how rarity can affect pricing. From everything I have read from other posters that have owned them, they don’t handle well, they’re heavy and overall not very sporty as compared to a coupe. So why then are they priced so much higher than the comparable 89 G Coupe? There were just over 2000 Speedsters produced globally (http://www.turbo-look.com/facts/speedster-statistics/) and just over 800 came to the US. Those are nearly identical figures to the Spyder.

We all know the Spyder isn’t all show, it has the handling and acceleration to match its looks. No it may not be 3x better than the 987.2 S but we know it’s better, same can not be said for the 89 Speedster.

The same can be said about many other rare Porsche’s in history, generally speaking prices don’t start off hot but with time they get noticed.

None of this should affect your usage, go out and enjoy the cars and put some miles on them. Just take good care of them and it won’t matter.
Marine Blue is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - About Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: