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New clutch really DIY operation?

 
Old 03-03-2019, 05:49 AM
  #16  
FRporscheman
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The first real mechanic job I ever did was the clutch on my mother's 944. (Damn, what a way to get into wrenching...)

That first time, it took me 6 months of off/on working on it and learning how to hold a wrench in my hand - I was 18. The second time, 2 years later on my own 944, I got it done in 6 days. Last time I did one was a couple of years ago on a turbo and I got it done in a day.

So nowadays I would not consider giving it to a mechanic since I've gotten pretty good at doing it. But I think $2200 is in the ballpark (maybe on the high end).

I vote you do it yourself. It sounds like you're capable enough to get through it. You might need a couple of new tools, so that's a bonus!

Originally Posted by V2Rocket View Post
when people ask me (and i ask myself) why i didn't/don't become a full-time mechanic, i think of stuff like this.
ditto. Or even worse, corroded parts on a GM (or any parts on a GM, TBH).
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Old 03-03-2019, 09:24 AM
  #17  
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I have done 2 clutch jobs in the past two years. Both on a two post lift. First one I pulled the torque tube and the second I dropped the engine out the bottom. If you don’t need to do seals on the engine I recommend pulling the tube.

It is a lot of work but not difficult. The biggest problem I had wasn’t the work itself, it was all of the seized bolts. Soak everything with pb blaster and smack the fasteners to “wake them up”.
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Old 03-05-2019, 04:18 PM
  #18  
Emefef
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I did mine last Father's Day weekend. I'm a bit claustrophobic, and I was working in the driveway so I looked at different types of ramps people had built. There are some really ingenious designs out there! In the end, I ended up constructing cribbing out of 2x6 planks and 4x4 posts. 12 little 16" square pallets. It took a while to jack it up, but with 3 of those under each wheel I had plenty of height and unobstructed access to work.
Lots of great tips here already - like pb blaster. I took a little longer because I wanted to clean things as well. I made new exhaust hangers, for example. One thing to think of in advance is how you're going to lower and raise the transmission. It can be done with jacks and a dolly, but it's tricky for one person. Somewhere during that process I knocked the fuel hose of the full tank, getting a pretty forceful stream of gas into my chest and lap before I got a finger stuck in the dyke.
It's probably the biggest - as in the amount of time and the number of significant steps - job I've done on a car, and I can certainly say it was the most gratifying.
Another thing to consider - I did mine in the summer, then during this winter when it was so cold (-25C) the hydraulics failed. I don't know if was the master or slave, but I replaced them both. That's something you may want to consider while you've already got it up, if your hydraulics are 30 years old too.
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Old 03-05-2019, 06:18 PM
  #19  
Otto Mechanic
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About PB Blaster: very good stuff but pricey. A better solution (pun intended) is to get a cheap spray bottle and fill it with a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone. Works better than PB blaster and you can make it for pennies a gallon.
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Old 03-05-2019, 07:47 PM
  #20  
Dan Martinic
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Originally Posted by Otto Mechanic View Post
About PB Blaster: very good stuff but pricey. A better solution (pun intended) is to get a cheap spray bottle and fill it with a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone. Works better than PB blaster and you can make it for pennies a gallon.
Didn't work on these I'm afraid





To the OP: do it. Serious bragging rights

If your work space isn't a tent in the middle of winter, you'll be just fine. Hardest part was the rusted and seized fasteners. I almost gave up, but glad I didn't; I would almost look forward to doing another. Almost.

Do get the transmission jack. Don't bother with the hoist; I got a good 20+" from HD stands and it is plenty. Have PET handy at all times. Plan to wait for parts. You'll find more to replace. Order exhaust rings now!


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Old 03-06-2019, 02:30 PM
  #21  
Otto Mechanic
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Originally Posted by Dan Martinic View Post


Didn't work on these I'm afraid



Dan, I doubt anything would work on those...

While working on replacing the fuel lines in my 928 I had to resort to freezing the couplers to break them loose; bimetallic corrosion had virtually welded the aluminum fuel lines to the copper fuel cooler. It took many different tools and several days to break them loose with ongoing advice and assistance from Greg Brown down in SoCal.


Originally Posted by Dan Martinic View Post
To the OP: do it. Serious bragging rights

If your work space isn't a tent in the middle of winter, you'll be just fine. Hardest part was the rusted and seized fasteners. I almost gave up, but glad I didn't; I would almost look forward to doing another. Almost.

Do get the transmission jack. Don't bother with the hoist; I got a good 20+" from HD stands and it is plenty. Have PET handy at all times. Plan to wait for parts. You'll find more to replace. Order exhaust rings now!




Second the transmission jack. I got mine from Harbor Freight, about $200 delivered, but it's tall and meant for use under a lift. There are short versions that you can use with jack stands. I did also use an engine brace ($80, Harbor Freight ) but you can use a piece of 3/4" plywood (1'x2') and a jack under the oil pan to support the engine also. I just didn't like the risk here in earthquake country.

When setting the drive shaft in the rear main seal/pilot bearing, you'll likely need a jack under the engine to do fine adjustments to the entry angle anyway. I have a rolling jack on the 4 post I used for that purpose.
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Old 03-06-2019, 03:04 PM
  #22  
Dan Martinic
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Originally Posted by Otto Mechanic View Post
Dan, I doubt anything would work on those...
...
Second the transmission jack. I got mine from Harbor Freight, about $200 delivered, but it's tall and meant for use under a lift. There are short versions that you can use with jack stands. I did also use an engine brace ($80, Harbor Freight ) but you can use a piece of 3/4" plywood (1'x2') and a jack under the oil pan to support the engine also. I just didn't like the risk here in earthquake country.

When setting the drive shaft in the rear main seal/pilot bearing, you'll likely need a jack under the engine to do fine adjustments to the entry angle anyway. I have a rolling jack on the 4 post I used for that purpose.
Oh I know! I had some serious rusted fasteners. Many salty winters up here. I basically had to cut & drill everything. Interesting enough, the wastegate came apart nicely with a torch. Well, maybe "nicely" isn't the best word.. but heating, cooling, heating, cooling... then finally turning worked. I had to take it to work though and use the big acetylene tank. I find these silly sprays don't do much; if it's stuck, heat is good--usually my little propane pencil torch works. Otherwise, a longer handle.

You guys are lucky down there: this $99 cheapo would suffice: https://www.harborfreight.com/450-lb...ack-61232.html

Since I was working during the winter, I must have got a holiday special; I managed this one for $140 CAD (half price):



It's overkill, really. That HF hundred-dollar special is just fine and takes up way less room in the shed afterwards

As for engine support, a couple of videos I referenced didn't show one, and I have to report that I didn't use any such thing. It appears the 951 motor is perfectly balanced on its two crossmember mounts. Sliding the torque tube in was easy; I used the plastic alignment tool on the clutch first. Can't remember if the engine had a bit of play on its mounts.. don't think it was needed.

Last edited by Dan Martinic; 03-06-2019 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 03-06-2019, 04:45 PM
  #23  
Otto Mechanic
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Originally Posted by Dan Martinic View Post
You guys are lucky down there: this $99 cheapo would suffice: https://www.harborfreight.com/450-lb...ack-61232.html
That's the one I was talking about. Since I had the lift I needed the tall one but for jack stands that should be perfect.

Regards,
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Old 03-08-2019, 04:19 PM
  #24  
Ashman
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Thanks to everyone for the responses.

A lot to consider here.

I appreciate everyone relaying their experience with this process.
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Old 03-10-2019, 02:26 PM
  #25  
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I can't imagine a more detailed series of how-to videos for changing the clutch than what edredas offers on youtube. In particular, his inclusion of what tools to use and where makes this my go-to source of help.
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Old 03-10-2019, 04:33 PM
  #26  
Dan Martinic
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That video is excellent: as are most of his videos! I will add that watching a couple is the best bet; everyone has something to add. For example, the German guy "irene" has a great view of checking the clutch fork movement and seems to follow "the book" more thoroughly. I like both guy's channels. We are lucky to have them. And let's not forget Van's! Awesome tutorial
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Old 03-10-2019, 11:55 PM
  #27  
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I did it many years ago on jack stands, over (I think) a long weekend. Like others have said, not really hard (unless some fasteners are stuck) but lots of steps. Fond (sort of) memories.
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Old 03-11-2019, 12:39 PM
  #28  
curtisr
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Originally Posted by Dan Martinic View Post
That video is excellent: as are most of his videos! I will add that watching a couple is the best bet; everyone has something to add. For example, the German guy "irene" has a great view of checking the clutch fork movement and seems to follow "the book" more thoroughly. I like both guy's channels. We are lucky to have them. And let's not forget Van's! Awesome tutorial
Totally agree.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:07 AM
  #29  
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I changed the clutch on my 924 last year on the garage floor with just trolley jacks and standard home tools. Taking it steady and in a logical manner the jobs not to bad (I know the 944 has additional hydraulic components over the 924) and my biggest concern regarding dropping the gearbox wasn't anywhere as bad as I though it would be. I did the job in about 14 hours over a week and really quite rewarding.

I kept a rough diary of the work here https://www.porscheclubgb.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=1006375

Good luck
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