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My 1978 3.0 L head stud replacement thread

 
Old 08-18-2011, 03:52 AM
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Brett San Diego
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Default My 1978 3.0 L head stud replacement thread

I'll start a fresh thread for documenting my head stud replacement. The reason for pulling the engine was one broken exhaust stud (#3 exhaust side). My plan is to replace all exhaust side studs with the factory 993 studs. I'll also be installing oil-fed tensioners along the way. Clutch will be checked. I have no history on the clutch, so I have no idea of its condition. I do not intend to undertake a valve job at this time, but we'll see how things go.

Here's my getting started post reproduced from my engine drop announcement thread:

The engine drop went well. I do have a lift, a Bend Pak low-rise lift (LR60P). Turns out this lift is not high enough to remove the engine without bumper removal. I was kind of bummed about that. I think we had about 31-32 inches of clearance under the bumper with the lift at max height. I just measured height of the engine plus jack platform with the ATV jack all the way down. It's at 34 inches to the high point, the top of the CIS intake boot. Next time, I'll get the mid-rise.

Only issues were the clutch helper spring arm wouldn't come off the clutch fork shaft like it should, even with a little pry bar persuasion so we just left it on for now. And, there were a couple of snags, literally. The drivers side CV joint, which was hanging loose, caught on the throttle cable linkage rod as we were lifting the car off the engine, which was resting on the platform on the ATV jack. It bent the linkage rod nicely, but it's probably salvageable. For the record, 101 projects did say to remove this linkage. Then, a free end of one of the oil lines to the thremostat caught on the AC compressor mounting platform causing the engine/transmission to tilt forward off the platform. At first, I thought that maybe we didn't have the platform far enough under the engine/transmission (We positioned it just under the engine with the transmission unsupported.) and the weight of the transmission was causing the whole assembly to tip off the platform, but no, it was the oil line pulling the front of the engine up with the body as the lift went up. I might just replace that oil line since the tug that it got was in the direction of pulling the soft part of the hose directly out of the crimp to the hard section. I'd hate to have a weakened crimp lead to a bursting oil hose. And, oh yeah, there's a ground strap from the transmission to the body that I missed. It tore cleanly.

I'm grateful to Ed and Ed for their assistance. Of anyone who could have shown up, I probably got the two most experienced pair of hands. Many thanks.

I'm glad someone took a couple pictures during the process, because I took none. Ed and Ed were kind of on a schedule, so we kept busy.

A couple pics after the fact.

Proof that it's out


I have just removed the muffler and cat, most of the engine tin, and the heater blower and heater hoses. The muffler and cat came off well. I expected more trouble with rusted bolts. I sprayed penetrant a couple days before, and all broke loose fine except one. Fortunately, it didn't round off, but rather, the bolt broke cleanly and was able to be removed without issue.







The broken stud story in pics. This is an image of the flywheel side of the engine showing cylinder #3. (Engine tin normally covers this area.) Notice the missing stud barrel nut on the exhaust (bottom) side.






Normally, this part of #3 is covered by engine tin. In the above pic, it looks like the stud should fall out without having to remove the valve cover, but the engine tin closes up the area. Here's a pic of the tin still in place.


Brett

Edit: I've attached the same pics at the bottom with Rennlist's attachment feature. That way they will stick around in perpetuity. The above pics are on tinypic.com and won't last.
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Last edited by Brett San Diego; 08-18-2011 at 04:07 AM.
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Old 08-18-2011, 06:00 PM
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I spent last night putting the driver's side CV joint back together and wondering if I did it right. The joint came apart when the throttle linkage caught on it. When I saw ball bearings in the bottom of the bag, my heart sank. I thought I recall reading there is a right and wrong configuration. I need to read some more or maybe someone can educate me. I can seem to rotate the CV joint in all directions just like the other one that did not come apart, so I think it's OK. What a frickin' mess, though. I rebuilt the half shafts myself a few years ago. I was better able to control the grease then, when the joint was together. This time, putting ***** back into a greased joint while it's on the shaft is a ridiculous task. And I'll probably need to replace the gaskets on both sides of the joints when everything is going back together, which means pulling the joints off the shafts... Not looking forward to that at all. I'm getting pissed about the task just thinking about it. LOL

I've got some pics of intake removal to post this evening.

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Old 08-19-2011, 02:45 AM
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Here are pics of intake and CIS fuel injection removal. It’s all pretty straightforward but fidgety because some of the nuts are difficult to reach. Get your U-joint socket adapter out. 12 nuts hold the intake tubes to the cylinder heads. I didn’t bother to look up torque specs, but I broke all but one loose with just a 1/4 in drive socket.

The breather hose is in the way of access to the inner #6 nut. The hose was hardened, and I couldn’t pull it off the breather cover, so it got cut.

The inner nut of #5 is blocked by the auxiliary air regulator (often called AAR on the discussion forums). Note the separate part not to be confused with the AAR, the auxiliary air valve (AAV), which I have pointed out. Some people may be more handy with bent wrenches to allow access to this nut, but I removed the AAR to allow me to reach it.

First remove the electrical connector. Here is a detailed description of doing so. I had difficulty the first time I tried to remove one of these on my warm up regulator and broke part of the connector, so hopefully, this will save someone else from the same trouble. First pic is of the retaining wire clip. It wraps around 3 sides of the connector.

I don’t know if there is a trick to these things, but I pull up one side of the wire clip with a pick tool. When you get it into the position in the below pic, the opposite side also shifts enough so that the wire clip is clear of the retaining tangs on either side, and you can pull the connector off.

Then you put the wire back in place. The wire snaps over the retainers when you slide the connector back on. The AAR comes off with two allen bolts, and access is easy to the #5 nut.
Here’s a pic through the AAR air passage. Of course, it’s open now since it’s cold. When the AAR warms up with the engine, this passage closes down, and the idle drops to normal.


continued in next post
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Old 08-19-2011, 02:51 AM
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Then it’s just a matter of finding all the electrical connections and disconnecting them. There aren’t that many. (Edit: Mystery connector is the fuel pump cut-off switch.)

Warm up regulator (often abbreviated WUR)

There are a couple others. One to the distributor, oil pressure sensors front and rear, and temp sensors on each timing chain cover, heater blower, thermo-time valve (I think it’s called). Then the intake and CIS system comes off as a unit with a little tugging here and there, and goes on the shelf to await refreshening of vacuum hoses and what-not during reassembly.

Here’s the typical breather hose oil leak.

And, here are some images of grime in the intake of the cylinder heads. I assume this is normal. If not someone can school me on it. All 6 intakes were pretty uniform in appearance, and all showed about the same amount of carbon build up on the backside of the intake valves. That’s probably a good sign. The engine ran great when it was parked a 3 years ago.


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Last edited by Brett San Diego; 08-19-2011 at 04:01 PM.
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Old 08-19-2011, 02:29 PM
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BTW, feel free to comment or provide information in this thread. I know iceman didn't want to clutter things, but on the other hand, useful stuff could get lost in a separate thread.

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Old 08-19-2011, 03:20 PM
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Brett, great thread man!

I have just finished removing all of the ancillary parts off of my '85s engine. I will take a picture of the intake port and valve back-side over the weekend for comparison purposes. I have not look to closely yet, but I think in might have a fairly similar appearance.
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Old 08-19-2011, 04:45 PM
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This might be a good time to consider changing the injector o-rings. Those sleeves are a biotch to get out of the intakes, and if they leak, you'd have a hard time changing them with the engine in the car. It's possible, but very difficult.
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Old 08-19-2011, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by rusnak View Post
This might be a good time to consider changing the injector o-rings. Those sleeves are a biotch to get out of the intakes, and if they leak, you'd have a hard time changing them with the engine in the car. It's possible, but very difficult.
Yes, on the list of CIS refreshing things to do. O-rings and sleeves.

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Old 08-21-2011, 01:05 AM
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Great thread, just in time. I am about to takle 2 broken headstuds in my '81...

I will be following this with great interest!
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Old 08-21-2011, 01:24 AM
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Brett, here is what my intake ports looked like. Pete went on to tell me to use lacquer thinner. Take the valve to the top where it is good and seated and start wiping it around the port with something soft like a q-tip.

https://rennlist.com/forums/5331741-post45.html
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Old 08-21-2011, 03:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Cajun View Post
Great thread, just in time. I am about to takle 2 broken headstuds in my '81...

I will be following this with great interest!
Good luck. I don't know how quickly I'll be moving. If you start soon, you could pass me up.

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Old 08-21-2011, 03:47 AM
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Originally Posted by amber lamps View Post
Brett, here is what my intake ports looked like. Pete went on to tell me to use lacquer thinner. Take the valve to the top where it is good and seated and start wiping it around the port with something soft like a q-tip.

https://rennlist.com/forums/5331741-post45.html
Thanks for the tip from Pete. About what I figured I'd be doing, if I don't send the cylinder heads out for a valve job. I already confirmed that a simple wipe with solvent will take off the grime.

I was pleased to find all 6 intakes looked almost identical.

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Old 08-22-2011, 01:07 AM
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So this is why you're taking the engine out....

Looks like 50% fun and 50% #[email protected]$#@%[email protected]!
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Old 08-22-2011, 12:00 PM
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This is how my intakes look. Unfortunately the dim light in the garage meant I was unable to get the camera to focus on the back side of the valve. The black coloring on the back side of the valve is pretty smooth, completely dry and "hard". I don't think I will try any cleaning at this point (I don't see much upside for the small risk involved).
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Old 08-22-2011, 02:46 PM
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Does your camera have a macro setting? Should help for the close up stuff.

Are you taking your engine apart or just freshening the outside? I saw your latest pics. It's quite clean especially under the shroud around the breather area. Did you clean it already or was it just well sealed?

You'll probably be back together and running long before me. Even with all your replating.

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