Notices
Racing & Drivers Education Forum
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Newbie Questions

 
Old 02-19-2008, 10:44 AM
  #1  
limey940
User
Thread Starter
 
limey940's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,600
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default Newbie Questions

I just signed up for my first track day in my 997s. Its a private track day, only 3 cars on the track at any time so i figured this would be a good first event.
Anyway, i used to road race a motorcycle and was also an motorcycle race instructor so Im familiar with some of the basics, but not as it relates to cars.
I want to practice/learn H & T techniques but i wanted to ask for some high level advise re braking. Is there any special points i should remember other than not (i assume) being to aggresive initially. With a motorcycle smoothness is the key, so when braking you squeeze the brakes on giving the suspension time to adjust, then you can go into full pressure, same when getting on the gas coming out of corners.
So, any advise/help or pointers will be much appreciated,.
cheers
limey940 is offline  
Old 02-19-2008, 10:52 AM
  #2  
Gary R.
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Gary R.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Valencia, Spain
Posts: 15,002
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Get a coach/instructor in the car with you.
Gary R. is offline  
Old 02-19-2008, 11:04 AM
  #3  
chrisp
User
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: CT
Posts: 1,614
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Definitely. You need an instructor of some sort.
chrisp is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 10:34 AM
  #4  
limey940
User
Thread Starter
 
limey940's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,600
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

most helpfull, thanks
limey940 is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 04:30 PM
  #5  
racer
Super User
 
racer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,981
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

I have found that my best "students" have had motorcycle experience. Motorcycles teach you balance and smoothness, both of which are needed in cars. I have also found the motorcycle experience to be a great "butt dyno" in that the balance learned on a bike translates into awareness of what the car is doing, sometimes on a subconscious level.

That said, having a coach/instructor in the car with you will help with your transition to smooth H/T in a car..
racer is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 05:00 PM
  #6  
limey940
User
Thread Starter
 
limey940's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,600
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by racer View Post
I have found that my best "students" have had motorcycle experience. Motorcycles teach you balance and smoothness, both of which are needed in cars. I have also found the motorcycle experience to be a great "butt dyno" in that the balance learned on a bike translates into awareness of what the car is doing, sometimes on a subconscious level.

That said, having a coach/instructor in the car with you will help with your transition to smooth H/T in a car..
Thanks racer, i just exchanged several e mails with the person who is organizing the track day and he gave me soem great advise. Along with that there will be instructors (including a PCA instructor) available which i will take advantage of. I was hoping for soem thoughts and suggestions from the people on this board, but as i say i got soem good advise via direct e mail.
Actually just went out and practised H & T and i feel that is strating to come togther a little, anyway, thanks a lot for the response.
cheers
limey940 is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 05:05 PM
  #7  
John H
Addict
Rennlist Member

 
John H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Portsmouth, Ohio
Posts: 4,822
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

If you are wanting to work on heel/toe, I'd start out at about 5/10 and work my way up as the comfort level etc increases. Maybe start off doing it only on pretty straight forward braking zones/turn-ins. That's what I did when learning to left foot brake.
John H is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 05:12 PM
  #8  
limey940
User
Thread Starter
 
limey940's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,600
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by John H View Post
If you are wanting to work on heel/toe, I'd start out at about 5/10 and work my way up as the comfort level etc increases. Maybe start off doing it only on pretty straight forward braking zones/turn-ins. That's what I did when learning to left foot brake.
Thats exactly what i was doing. I started of just slowing down by taking my foot of the gas, downshifting and matching the revs, no H and T. When that started coming togtehr i cruised in 4th, (on a long straight deserted street) and practised soem actual T & H. I then did it along soem twisties at about 4/10, just to get a feel for it. It seemed to be a lot easier when i was braking heavily as the pedal becomes more in line w/ the gas pedal making the blip easier.
Anyway, im enjoying learning a new skill and look forward to taking it to the track.

cheers
limey940 is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 05:58 PM
  #9  
DarkSideDE
User
 
DarkSideDE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 627
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

As you know from motorcycles - smoothness is the key, same for driving your car on the track.

I'd like to suggest you get yourself to a PCA or PCA-style Driver Ed - where they put an experienced instructor in that lovely Carrera S with you, and go over the basics. Then you can get all the seat time you want to become proficient in the areas you are looking to excel in. If you read the heel/toe thread you'll see just about every instructor that is registered on Rennlist really loves their h/t --

But what everyone here will tell you, is practice, practice, practice -- and smile - because it is something you truly enjoy dooing.
DarkSideDE is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 06:08 PM
  #10  
RonCT
Moderator
Rennlist Member
 
RonCT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 4,982
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

My advice - don't worry about HT on your first track day in a new car - just put it out of your mind and let it come when it's natural. I don't even expect people to HT until they are well into Yellow and some don't until White. Remember, an upper rebuild is probably $10k...

Point of reference - my son is 18, a "natural", and started DE last spring. Toward the end of his 2nd track day (3nd session of that day, meaning 6 sessions under his belt altogether) he started HT and nailed it right off, which was much sooner than I did.

As I think everyone will attest to (do a search on HT) the street is a very difficult place to practice HT. The inputs are so different - if you can somehow get 10/10ths braking on the street, then you are probably a hazard or on your way to jail Unless you are at say 9/10 braking, the alignment will be very different...
RonCT is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 06:14 PM
  #11  
multi21
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
multi21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 9,976
Likes: 0
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
Default

[QUOTE=racer;5127566]I have found that my best "students" have had motorcycle experience. Motorcycles teach you balance and smoothness, both of which are needed in cars. I have also found the motorcycle experience to be a great "butt dyno" in that the balance learned on a bike translates into awareness of what the car is doing, sometimes on a subconscious level./QUOTE]

I've noticed the same thing.
multi21 is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 06:18 PM
  #12  
Gary R.
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Gary R.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Valencia, Spain
Posts: 15,002
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Well, I raced motorcycles and I suck.. and I did it in the woods!
Gary R. is offline  
Old 02-20-2008, 09:53 PM
  #13  
limey940
User
Thread Starter
 
limey940's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,600
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Thank you everyone for your responses. I will join PCA and look at doing some more events, i have a feeling this is going to become an obsession and i will be exploring a track only car ar some point....

cheers
limey940 is offline  
Old 02-21-2008, 04:09 PM
  #14  
JCP911S
Addict
Rennlist Member

 
JCP911S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 5,341
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by RonCT View Post
My advice - don't worry about HT on your first track day in a new car - ...
Agree. 997 has enough torque that you can leave it one gear and get around.

Concentrate on

1) Learning the track

2) Setting the wheel and balancing the car in the turns

3) Getting your turn-in points set

4) Setting brake points

That's a good weekend's work

To learn H/T, practice on the street until it is as automatic as up-shifting. Its alot harder to H/T at street speeds than track speeds. If you can execute seamless H/T downshifts on the steet, doing it at the track will be apiece of cake
JCP911S is offline  
Old 02-21-2008, 08:20 PM
  #15  
Sean F
NASA Racer
Rennlist Member
 
Sean F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Westchester, NY
Posts: 4,705
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Originally Posted by Gary R. View Post
Well, I raced motorcycles and I suck.. and I did it in the woods!
That must be why you're always trying to put your car in the woods
Sean F is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - About Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: