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911 Carrera 4/4S Cabriolet

 
Old 05-22-2018, 11:26 AM
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ZenicaPA
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Default 911 Carrera 4/4S Cabriolet

Hello Forum,

I am looking to buy a 911 Carrera 4/4S Cabriolet. I am looking for one that is either CPO or preowned if well maintained.
The purpose of the car is to satisfy several requirements like being a fun daily driver suitable for all weather, convertible
seat four and have factory roll over protection for the occasional HPDE event. I am NOT a hard core HPDE driver and I
doubt I'll ever drive beyond the vehicle. I have a 2016 Z06 convertible that I can't track due to GM not thinking factory roll
over protection is something anyone would want. Perfectly good CCB going to waste.

What I don't know is:
Q1) What would be a fair price for one between 2014 to 2016
Q2) Are the 2014, 2015 and 2016 model years good or should I consider an earlier year as well?
Q3) What are some problem areas to look at?
Q4) Is PDK all the rage?
Q5) Is CCB good for track use or too costly?

I'm not in any rush so I'm taking my time to explore what is out there, this is where any help the forum can provide will be greatly appreciated.

David


p.s.

I'll admit, I am NOT a long time Porsche owner so the model numbering system is somewhat confusing for me, please let me know if this isn't being posted in the proper area.
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Old 05-22-2018, 12:35 PM
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Many tracks and event organizers will not let you use a convertible with pop-up roll over on board - its probably somewhere around 50% so there's that to consider. There are really few specific problem areas in the 991's, nothing that I know of to be on the lookout for in particular. Most 991 Convertibles will have PDK, there are few manuals out there. I have no idea what "CCB" means.
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Old 05-22-2018, 01:03 PM
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ZenicaPA
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@Drcollie,

Thanks for the info. I have looked at two HPDE venues and both allow convertibles with factory rollover protection so I should be ok there. I'm not a
die hard HPDE enthusiast and will be content with a few times a year where it's permissible.

I will have to drive a PDK vehicle to get an understanding of how it feels. I'd like a manual but the idea of a moneyshift scares the bejesus out of my wallet!

CCB is carbon ceramic brakes. I am probably not using the Porsche terminology by calling it CCB.
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Old 05-22-2018, 01:30 PM
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It's not only the venue, but frequently the organization running the HPDE that will put the restrictions on convertibles - its the sponsor organization's insurance that covers the event. So just double-check with the clubs you want to run with. I find Aston Martin and Ferrari clubs to be tolerant of convertibles with no roll cages. Others not so much.

The Carbon Ceramic Brakes are called PCCB in Porsche World. You probably won't find them on many convertibles because one of their main claims to fame is light weight and anyone concerned with light weight is not buying a Convertible or a Targa, and they are notoriously expensive if you have to replace the rotors (a brake job can cost $ 20K, yes - twenty thousand dollars).
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Old 05-22-2018, 02:36 PM
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Welcome Zenica,
I'm a relative newb to the P car world as well, but have spent more time than I'd care to admit researching the cars. I recently bought a 991.1 (first gen 991) 4S Cab. Looking at the model years that you are looking at, you're in the right place.

Q1: That's a tough question to answer. As you get into learning about the cars, Germans, but especially Porsche charges for options a la carte. A base 911 can easily go for more than a lightly optioned S if one were inclined to do that. Go to the Hot for Sale Thread here on RL. It'll give you a good idea of where the market is at based on the options that you are looking at. Mileage and conditions like most car play a part, but generally these cars are well taken care of. The options list is what really dictates the price. 2015+ are when the engines get a turbo in all levels. If you like NA engines get an earlier one. If you like the torque and are ok with the sound (and increased tech in the PCM) then a 15 or newer may be for you.

Q2: I'm generally wait at least 2-3 years into a new model production before I buy into it (like you suggested the 14+ mark). These cars are pretty bulletproof in general. I have a 13 and have had zero issues. Definitely get a PPI from a locally respected shop and it should give you a good indication of the condition of the car. Make sure all the services were done on time. As far as cabs go, make sure to get that a good look over. Many aftermarket warranties (Fidelity for example) don't cover tops.

Q3: For first year cars, the interior of the doors de-laminating is a "common" issue. Well know. Also the change over valves on earlier cars are a common problem. Other than that, again, pretty reliable.

Q4: I would consider myself a pretty die hard manual fan. All of my cars since I've been 16 have been manuals. I was looking to buy a manual but over the course of the year of searching for the right one, I "settled" for a PDK. All the top car reviewers will say that the PDK is up there with the Ferrari dual clutch as the best on the market. Pretty high praise. Do I miss rowing my own gears? Yes. Do I feel like the PDK is a big compromise? No. The shifts are fast and crisp, even on the downshifts. It's fun in its own right. If you like the bar bragging rights, PDK is generally a bit faster as well.

Q5: I don't have first hand experience with PCCB's but if you have the money it may be worth it. Less brake dust, yellow calipers, higher resistance to heat and fade, longer life. Realistically though, I haven't cooked my brakes enough even in auto cross, to over power the steel S brakes. I'd say not necessary, but if you have the money why not?

As far as the HPDE, make sure you check with your local group for rules on Cabs. I haven't had the chance to do a track day yet, but many of the rules are complicated and can vary by location.

Good luck on the hunt!
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