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Wheel / tire TRACK SETUP

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Old 10-18-2017, 02:21 AM
  #1
RODOLFO04
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Default Wheel / tire TRACK SETUP

For a 991.2 C4

what wheel tire setup would you guys recomend for trackdays

i am talking about full slicks or semi-slick tires

looking into it, or should i just go with michelin cup 2 tires?

appreciate your commets

thanks
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Old 10-18-2017, 03:49 AM
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I'm happy with OEM 20 inch rims wearing MPSC2 (currently N0 but will move to N1 when they become available).

Was going to give the Corsas a go this time but the order got stuffed up. I believe Tire Rack stock both PZC4 Corsas in Porsche spec suitable for 20 inch rims and N0 MPSC2.

Very little point in going to a full slick unless you're running a dedicated track car and involved in W2W (also keep in mind you can pull huge lateral g's with a full slick and this my have a detrimental impact on oiling e.g. starvation through high g corners).

Last edited by randr; 10-18-2017 at 04:11 AM.
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Old 10-18-2017, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by RODOLFO04 View Post
For a 991.2 C4

what wheel tire setup would you guys recomend for trackdays

i am talking about full slicks or semi-slick tires

looking into it, or should i just go with michelin cup 2 tires?

appreciate your commets

thanks
You run the risk of blowing up your engine on the track running slicks on your car. PAG will not warranty it, if they find out or suspect you are running slicks. It's not to difficult to determine oil starvation from using slicks.

Personally, I love the SC2's for the track. My '14 & '16 had 20" wheels, which I didn't like much on the track. Feedback was a bit light for my taste. I bought a set of OZ HLT's in 19" and ran those wheels with SC2's. I think I went through 6 or 7 sets of tires in three seasons. I have yet to track my GT3, but I will continue to use the SC2's with the stock wheels.

I think the SC2's are excellent and I hear the new tire (version N1) is even better from the folks using them in Europe. They should land here beginning of the year.
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:31 PM
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I went with OZ Leggera HLT in 19's. I like 255 in the front, for better front end grip. Cup 2's are great, and have also tried Bridgestone RE71R and feel like they have better change of direction then the Sport cup 2s.

Great thing about those two tires are you can drive to events on them.
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:35 PM
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Michelin cup 2 tire are more than sufficient. The new P4S would even be more than fine... For wheels - make sure you get something reputable and forged for the track - not flow forged or rotary forged as those are made up things for marketing. Just. Forged.

OZ is good as someone mentioned. CCW is another tried and true that I highly recommend. Of course there is HRE and the like but you want something strong and light > pretty.
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by jwr9152 View Post
I went with OZ Leggera HLT in 19's. I like 255 in the front, for better front end grip. Cup 2's are great, and have also tried Bridgestone RE71R and feel like they have better change of direction then the Sport cup 2s.

Great thing about those two tires are you can drive to events on them.
The RE71R does not meet the load rating required by the manufacturer. Normally, I would not even think about it, but on the track with the loads, I opted to go more conservative with the SC2's. I would have loved to save the $ diff. on 6-7 sets of tires.
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Old 10-18-2017, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by 991carreradriver View Post
The RE71R does not meet the load rating required by the manufacturer. Normally, I would not even think about it, but on the track with the loads, I opted to go more conservative with the SC2's. I would have loved to save the $ diff. on 6-7 sets of tires.
I second this implicit in the load ratings are elements of construction that impart stiffness. Porsche load ratings are very explicit for good reasons e.g car weight distribution.
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:25 PM
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With an All Wheel Drive car you want to stay with stock outer dimensions on the tires. You can't have any change there so stick with stock sizes. cup 2's are great for a drivable tire to the track. You will need at least -1.5 degrees camber front and rear and thats about max you will get with stock suspension.

going to slicks takes more than just mounting tires on the car. Slicks will require a lot more negative camber than your stock suspense can do so you will need further suspension mods to use slicks. Also you will need something like Pagid RS29 Yellow or Ferodo DS1.1 or Race Tech RE10 pads to take advantage of slicks and these race pads are not good on the street. Also with all the rubber at all the suspension mounting points slicks are not a good idea.

You didn't say what you track experience is...but until you get very far advanced and set your car up for slicks....slicks or even something like Hoosier R7's will not work on your car...you will destroy them in 1/2 a day with out the proper set up.
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Old 10-18-2017, 11:10 PM
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Originally Posted by 991carreradriver View Post
The RE71R does not meet the load rating required by the manufacturer. Normally, I would not even think about it, but on the track with the loads, I opted to go more conservative with the SC2's. I would have loved to save the $ diff. on 6-7 sets of tires.
I've been running them all year without issue. The load ratings were so close it doesn't concern me, but I certainly respect your opinion.
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Old 10-18-2017, 11:18 PM
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Originally Posted by mdrums View Post
With an All Wheel Drive car you want to stay with stock outer dimensions on the tires. You can't have any change there so stick with stock sizes.
This is not a true statement. I have a 4S and run 19" wheels at the track and 20's around town with 255 fronts. Even in the display I have an option for 19's or 20's. You just have to keep the difference from front to rear less then 5% I believe. Can't remember the exact number off the top of my head, but you can search on here for it.
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Old 10-18-2017, 11:41 PM
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old rule of thumb was 3% max difference in diameters front to back.

you can go down in size in both if you keep the ratio reasonably constant.

just the mph will be off.
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Old 10-19-2017, 02:49 AM
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Thanks for all the help

seems like michelin cup 2 is going to be

were is everyone getting them from? Tire rack?

thanks again
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Old 10-19-2017, 10:24 AM
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Tire rack and be sure to heat cycle them at purchase.
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Old 10-19-2017, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by 991carreradriver View Post
Tire rack and be sure to heat cycle them at purchase.
what is the purpose of heat cycling them?
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Old 10-19-2017, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by RODOLFO04 View Post
what is the purpose of heat cycling them?
FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestMailTIRE TECH
Competition Tire Heat Cycling Service

(Lea en espa˝ol)

Many tire manufacturers use very aggressive tread compounds for the Track & Competition DOT-legal tires they've developed for autocrossing, track days and road racing. And just like other high performance parts, these tires will provide more consistent performance and last longer if they are properly broken in.

The first time Track & Competition DOT tires go into service is very important. All tires deflect under load, and their tread rubber compounds repeatedly stretch and relax as they roll into and out of contact with the road. This stretching breaks some of the weaker bonds between the tread rubber molecules, generating heat. If new Track & Competition DOT tires are initially run too aggressively, too hot or too long, some of the stronger bonds will also be broken, which reduces tire grip and wear.

Picture of tire on heat cycling machine spinning
Putting new Track & Competition DOT tires through an easy initial heat cycle and then not running them for a minimum of 24 hours allows the rubber bonds to relink in a more uniform manner than they were originally manufactured. Heat cycling actually makes Track & Competition DOT tread compounds more consistent in strength and more resistant to losing their strength the next time they are used.

While it's important to heat cycle tires, how it's done isn't as important.

On the Track
Heat cycling can be done by installing tires on the car and running 10 to 15 minutes on a racetrack. Start with easy laps, and build up speed as the session continues. End up running 5-10 seconds off your normal pace and be careful not to spike the tire temperatures by spinning, sliding or locking the tires.

An important step in tire heat cycling is that after being brought up to temperature, the tires require a minimum of 24 hours to relax and relink the bonds between the rubber molecules. Drivers attempting to heat cycle tires in the morning for use a few hours later in the afternoon will not experience any benefits from the morning attempt at heat cycling. Heat cycling tires on Saturday means not using them again until the same time on Sunday.

By Tire Rack

Close up of heat cycle stamp
Our heat cycling service begins by mounting the tire on an appropriate-width wheel and inflating it to the desired pressure. It is then placed in our heat cycling machine which has three rollers positioned at the corners of a triangle. The tread flexes where it comes into contact with each of the rollers, stretching the rubber compound enough to progressively bring it up to temperature all the way around the tire and across the tread. There is no artificial heat added by an oven, forced air or heat lamp.

The tread temperature is monitored with a pyrometer to confirm when the tire has reached the desired 170-180░ F temperature. The tire is then dismounted and stamped as Tire Rack heat cycled. Since the minimum 24-hour waiting period typically occurs while the tires are in transit, the tires are ready to use when they arrive!

The only thing our heat cycling service doesn't do is scuff in the tires.

Choices
While both ways will get the job done, many driving enthusiasts have chosen Tire Rack's heat cycling service because it allows them to maximize their time on the track. They don't have to invest in extra sets of wheels to manage multiple sets of tires, nor dedicate early weekend sessions to heat cycling new tires for the following days.

We've compared tire heat cycling done on our test track and in our heat-cycling machine. Measuring the tread temperatures with a probe-style pyrometer has confirmed we can't quite duplicate the heat cycling machine's controlled process with tires mounted on a car. We found on-the-car heat cycling was challenged by different driveline configurations (front-wheel, rear-wheel or all-wheel drive), vehicle weight distributions and competition camber settings that made it difficult to generate even tire temperatures on front and rear axle positions, as well as across the entire tread. Our heat-cycling machine allowed us to achieve appropriate and more consistent temperatures across the tire's tread without causing treadwear.

The cost of heat cycling is $15 per tire and is recommend by competition tire manufacturers.
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