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-   -   Forgive me Rennlisters, for I have sinned (https://rennlist.com/forums/964-forum/715117-forgive-me-rennlisters-for-i-have-sinned.html)

ZG862 09-04-2012 04:54 AM

Forgive me Rennlisters, for I have sinned
 
This is my first confession, and I’m afraid it is rather lengthy. Here goes:

At a particularly eventful stage in my life back in 2001, I jacked in my job, started a company with some ex colleagues and (like you do) went shopping for a Porsche. Up until this point I had only ever owned mid-engined cars, having had a mis-spent childhood playing too many Top Trumps games (especially “Sports Cars” which featured a silver SC Targa and a brown (yuk!) Turbo), reading far too many car books and in particular pretty much anything I could read about Porsche (men, company and cars); there was always going to be an air-cooled flat 6 in my future. Hell, I even had the Bruce Anderson book on performance upgrades, the Porter/Morgan renovation book, and a Tamiya 1:24 959 & 1:12 934.

Whilst I wanted a 993, they were out of my price range and I eventually settled on a 1993 Slate Grey 964 C2 with pale grey interior from the Aberdeen OPC, that came with reasonably low miles and a warranty. I’d post a picture, but you all know what they look like at a dealership. It even had the mini hoop spoiler and narrow-spoke 92 cup wheels (you know - the ones with the 944 part number that someone here had on their white car painted red). It was quite a step up from the MR2 it replaced and most of my miles were leisure miles; I don’t think I stopped grinning for weeks.

Service time came, and I found enough time in my hectic schedule to take the car to my local OPC. As seems to be the norm, on collecting it I inverted my wallet and kept shaking hard until it was well and truly emptied but with the comfort of knowing it had had its premium washer fluid topped up with factory approved hands. Hmmm.

At about this point, the company moved and the car became my daily commute – a round trip of about 70 miles. Though the company grew, finances were tight and the directors took the brunt so the next few oil and filter changes were done with my own fair hands. Likewise I located the source of a hydraulic leak in the steering circuit and replaced the offending pipework. To make matters both better and worse I then got married to someone who lived miles from the office and the poor 964 had to brave rain, snow and the horrors of gritted motorways far more regularly than I had intended.

Since my dad had trained as an engineer, I knew the basics of a toolset but I neither had the time nor the funds at this point to gather all the information I needed to address the next big job that the car threw at me. The inevitable smoking and apparently increasing loss of full oil pressure showed I had an oil leak that didn't simply go away as I topped up the oil each trip. Removing the undertray revealed that the flexible pipe from filter housing to crankcase was cracked and the oil dripping on to the heat exchangers. So here comes the first significant sin; I thought I knew enough to replace the pipe myself. When it became apparent that the heat exchangers had to come off and that some of the retaining nuts were held on by Bavarian magic, I phoned my mate who managed a trade motor factors branch. A few days later I had a selection of crows foot spanners and long reach allen wrenches with which to attack the Plusgas-soaked nuts. Miraculously, eleven came off fine. The twelfth… well you know what’s coming. “Ping!” went the stud, and the nut - grimly attached to half of it - emerged from my socket.

“Oh dear”, I said. Or something like it.

Sin number two is, I know, unforgivable. What’s the general advice? “When in a hole, stop digging”?
Well instead, I broke out my electric drill and never used stud extractor set. I’d seen the warning section in the Anderson book about bodged stud replacements and how to use a Timesert but still I continued. After all, the car was immobile on stands in front of the house, miles from any expert, unaffordable, Porsche dealer. I could do this. A few minutes later I had a cleanly drilled out stud stump – with a broken, hardened steel extractor stuck in it. At this point, my father turned in his grave and reminded me silently about the value of heating parts that need to be separated.

“Oh, bother”, I said repeatedly. Or something like it.

So I completed the job somewhat more carefully and fitted the new pipe (thanks Type911 for your reasonable prices and fantastic service). What to do about the stud? Hmm. Well, let’s just bolt the exhaust up for now and see how badly it leaks. Turns out it doesn’t leak but really, that’s no excuse for not shamefacedly taking it around to a grown up and watching them shake their heads and suck through their teeth.

Instead, necessity kept me driving it, and though it had a trip to JZ Machtech who got it through an MoT test, the lack of maintenance investment began to tell. When the next harsh winter had it cutting out on the motorway I took 30 seconds to come to the considered expert conclusion that it clearly had an unidentifiable electrical fault somewhere in the fusebox and since the company now had enough to give me a car allowance there was only one thing for it. Oh, and we’d had a baby by this point too.

-.-

Don’t be daft, I wasn’t going to sell it! I might be guilty but not bonkers. Now not even well enough to move under its own combustion, I towed it down to the garage and hauled it in.

Fast forward 6 years to May this year, when my wife said, “It was lovely to drive, that Porsche. Should we get it going again?”

What I suspect she meant was, “The garage is a state. Get rid of the car.”

Nevertheless:
1) New battery. Check the belts. Some ignition lights, not a sausage from the starter.
2) New DME Relay. All the right clicks, not a sausage from the starter.
3) Better get the starter out then lad. Pump all the tyres (I’m expecting them to be ruined but none seem perished so far. That’s a job that can wait.) Car on stands. Rear wheels off. Engine cover off. Transmission cover off. Drive shafts off (my god, those cap screws were hard work). Clutch slave out (couldn’t believe it when the nuts started to turn. One took the stud with it but hey). Top starter nut… loosened!!! Double check battery disconnected, now let’s get in to the starter. Moments (a few weekends) later and the starter is in my hand.
4) It’s pretty clear what’s up. I should have posted a picture but it won’t take 1000 words to describe a rusty lump. Imagine a rusty lump with a corroded cable between solenoid and brushes. So, a few minutes on t’internet and a couple of phone calls and I have a new brush assembly in the post from Wood Auto Supplies. And some zinc based primer, some satin black tough paint and some wire brushes. And some stainless nuts & bolts to replace the rust monsters encountered so far.
5) One newly refurbished starter on the bench and let’s see how it gets on with the new battery and jump leads. Oh dear. Nothing. Try clamping a big bit of multi strand copper earth wire to the connector. Whizzz!! Yipppee.
6) Starter back in, connectors tight, battery connected, immobiliser disarmed, turn the key. Drdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrd. Pause. Drdrdrdrdrdrdr. Definitely not the right sounds but my pencil mark on the fan pulley has moved. Slightly. Back to Rennlist, more searches (this really is a lurker's paradise). Ah, of course. The earth. Thought it looked a bit rusty. Shall we have it out and add coppaslip? Ping! Not again! Broken earth bolt 11. For those who know about earth point 11, I don’t need to tell you that it is only accessible with a flexible drive, held at the full extent of your left arm (I’m right handed of course) with your right latching the drill on your left side by crossing over your body and safety glasses on to prevent the hot swarf from making a beeline for your eyeballs. Not a comfortable position. Even less comfortable when the drill bit binds in the whole and destroys the flexible drive all over your chest. Lesson: be very circumspect drilling out bolt stumps with a quill drive.
7) New earth bolt in the newly threaded earthing point and perhaps it’s a smart idea to take out some lower plugs to relieve the compression whilst (hopefully) some oil returns to the mechanical desert that is my crankcase. Disconnect the coils too I think.
8) Battery on, key again. Chugchugchugchugchugchug.chug..chug...chug....chug..drdrdrdrdr. Which means the battery is now struggling so it can sit on charge for a bit. This is beginning to look hopeful.
9) Well-charged battery back on. Turn it over quite a few times. A few times more. Let it rest for a bit to let the fuel evaporate before reconnecting the coils and dropping the (pretty good looking actually) plugs back in. HT leads all back & tight.
10) OK here we go. Turn the key. A little splutter. Turn the key again.

“Whoomph! Fire up the willing engine, responding with a roar.”

- And we have a project on our hands.


So, Rennlisters, I have a million questions for you but don’t feel yet absolved of my obvious sin of owning a 964 and behaving so badly towards it. I’m suitably remorseful and embarrassed about the er “incident” with the exhaust stud and even more so about letting my lovely 911 languish un-loved under a blanket in a non air-conditioned and perhaps just slightly damp and cold British domestic garage with nothing but a few SORN certificates for company. (For the cross-the-ponders, they’re bits of paper you get from the Driver Agency that prove that you are optimistic about the prospects of your wreck seeing the open road once more but not presently able to drive it to the test centre under its own power).

I humbly submit myself for chastisement and ritual humiliation.

Z

VR6-er 09-04-2012 06:28 AM

Hi Z,

Great to read your intro. What are your plans for it?

ZG862 09-04-2012 07:41 AM

Hi VR6-er.

The plan goes something like:
1) Refurb the brakes (in progress)
2) Replace clutch flexi hose
3) Bleed hydraulics
4) Tidy up surface corrosion from rear struts and trailing arms & generally clean up the crank case (see 9 below for thinking).
5) Adjust valve clearances (already struggling to separate cat & manifold: 4 sheared bolts, no movement. Heat perhaps?)
6) Sort out climate control (have some work in progress on the servo motors. Think there's a dud fan in the front somewhere too.)
7) Do air & fuel filters (plugs & dizzy look fine, though I have a belt/vent kit to fit)
8) Take it for an MoT test
9) See what oil leaks need addressing (doesn't seem like many)
10) Oil change (RAC man says synthetic oil doesn't degrade sitting in a tank and there's not much point in changing it until I'm ready to deal with leaks etc)

Then tax it, insure it & drive. Seems a little way off. I've no aspirations to do an RS-a-like and I don't think I should be even thinking about performance upgrade until I've dealt with that stud. All suggestions gratefully received - apart from the "Why don't you sell it to me?" variety!! ;)

Z

P-daddy 09-04-2012 08:00 AM

Wow great intro story. I think I've satisfied my reading needs on RL for the day:bigbye:

Johnny G Pipe 09-04-2012 08:08 AM

No advice, apart from, yes, heat! Heat is your friend! And if you trash the cat taking it off, a cat bypass is a nice option to be 'forced' to take..

Nice intro, plus excellent use of Rush lyrics! Are you still up near the sheep-worriers, then?

ZG862 09-04-2012 08:36 AM


Originally Posted by Johnny G Pipe (Post 9815419)
No advice, apart from, yes, heat! Heat is your friend! And if you trash the cat taking it off, a cat bypass is a nice option to be 'forced' to take..

OK, I'll dig out the propane tin. What do you reckon, general heat around the flange or concentrate on getting the bolts out first?


Originally Posted by Johnny G Pipe (Post 9815419)
Nice intro, plus excellent use of Rush lyrics!

Why thank you. I wondered if anyone would notice!! I'll find an excuse to slip "It's my turn to drive" in there at some point too. Oops - I just did.


Originally Posted by Johnny G Pipe (Post 9815419)
Are you still up near the sheep-worriers, then?

Ah no. I took a flight up to test the car and do the deal having looked at a mass of faxed paperwork. (Those were the days, etc.) They trailered the car down to London where I was at the time. Aberdeen looks great in the summer photos and there are some lovely roads but I could never live with the 2 hours daylight and farmyard customs. :icon107: :)

Z

alexjc4 09-04-2012 09:00 AM

Great story, thanks for sharing it, please keep us updated as the saga unfolds!

jack.pe 09-04-2012 11:44 AM

Entertaining intro!!! Please get us some pics ASAP:corn:

AOW162435 09-04-2012 02:01 PM

Awesome read. :)

I'm glad my starter does not give me sausage.


Andreas

ZG862 09-04-2012 02:20 PM

Thanks chaps. Pics will follow soon - I won't get back to the car until the weekend, although I may be able to take some of my refurbished rear disks. I'm pleased with these, as they now look like they're made from steel again (not rust) and I've sprayed the hats with high temperature paint. They don't look new - but that can wait until they need replacing. :)

I've taken the rear calipers with me whilst I'm away during the week. I've already got the pistons out on one side (used the brake pedal) but the pipe clamp was never going to allow me to do this to the other side so I'm hoping to find a compressed air source to blow them out. The logic behind removing them is that I want to take off and re-seat the stainless plates to ensure that my pads don't bind on them. Oddly enough, though my car was manufactured in late 1992 (according to th VIN) it has the 2 pot rears. I thought I should take out the pistons & seals before heating the plate retaining screws (see what I did then? ;)) to remove the plates. According to my information they're held in with Loctite 270 so ain't coming out until I melt it.

Question 1 is: Is it possible to remove the seals without damaging them or alternately to heat the plate retaining screws with the seals in place without melting them? I've not been able to find any posts where this was done with 2 pots...

Cheers,

Z

VR6-er 09-04-2012 07:14 PM


Originally Posted by ZG862 (Post 9815406)
Hi VR6-er.

The plan goes something like:
1) Refurb the brakes (in progress)
2) Replace clutch flexi hose
3) Bleed hydraulics
4) Tidy up surface corrosion from rear struts and trailing arms & generally clean up the crank case (see 9 below for thinking).
5) Adjust valve clearances (already struggling to separate cat & manifold: 4 sheared bolts, no movement. Heat perhaps?)
6) Sort out climate control (have some work in progress on the servo motors. Think there's a dud fan in the front somewhere too.)
7) Do air & fuel filters (plugs & dizzy look fine, though I have a belt/vent kit to fit)
8) Take it for an MoT test
9) See what oil leaks need addressing (doesn't seem like many)
10) Oil change (RAC man says synthetic oil doesn't degrade sitting in a tank and there's not much point in changing it until I'm ready to deal with leaks etc)

Then tax it, insure it & drive. Seems a little way off. I've no aspirations to do an RS-a-like and I don't think I should be even thinking about performance upgrade until I've dealt with that stud. All suggestions gratefully received - apart from the "Why don't you sell it to me?" variety!! ;)Z

Funny, I was thinking should I buy this car???? Best to just enjoy it, there is no point in a concourse rebuild unless its a part of a collection. It stops you driving it.

Laker 09-04-2012 07:16 PM

Great intro! Welcome - we're all sinners to some extent :biggulp:

ZG862 09-05-2012 01:54 PM

Thanks for the welcome Laker - I think I may have the same 16" wheels as you. Nice.

I really need to get some pics up of those rear calipers. I have the usual rusty looking plate screws and (intriguingly) small white waxy looking deposits in the cylinder - which I thought I'd cleaned out but must remain in the connecting chambers and perhaps thoughout my dormant braking system.

Q2: Anyone any ideas from my dodgy description what this might be or how worried about it I should be?

Cheers :cheers:,

Z

ZG862 09-20-2012 08:15 AM

Hello again.

Slow progress. I've managed to get all calipers and disks off now and am well into stripping down the calipers. Copious heat has helped remove many of the plate retaining button screws though I've a few that have "rounded off" the hex socket that I'm now trying to work an oversize imperial drive into (without much success - all suggestions on this very welcome).

I answered my own Q1: The dust seals come out with a little prising from some watchmakers screwdrivers, though those for the larger pistons on the front require the guide plate to be removed first. It seems to be OK to shield them to avoid damage from my gas torch when persuading the button screws. None seemed to have suffered any visible heat damage.

However, the front piston dust covers are in worse condition than the rears - a few have splits, though the seals seem to be in OK nick with no evidence of fluid leaking past them.

Q3: Should I replace all dust covers/seals or just those with visible damage?

Front disks seem to have faired less well than the rears, with some corrosion pitting on the inboard face. (Outboard cleans up pretty well with just a few small pits). So...

Q4: Replace the disks or have them skimmed? If the latter, do I just look up "local chap with big lathe" or is there some black art involved?

Many thanks in advance for your advice.

Z

ZG862 09-21-2012 01:53 PM

Eeeek!
Finally got the cat off, removed the LH tin & distributor caps in preparation for the valve adjustment, only to find broken dizzy drive belt (how long was it like that??) and cracked cat casing.

Fortunately I have a new belt, but the job isn't getting smaller...


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