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C2 v. C4 and years to avoid?

 
Old 08-18-2001, 11:01 PM
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nostatic
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Post C2 v. C4 and years to avoid?

I seem to be running across '90 C2's that I can afford (low-mid $20's). Is this a year to be avoided (assuming the flywheel has been replaced with a Luk and the distributor is vented)? Also, are there any general arguments on C2 v. C4? I live in SoCal, but I have to admit that the awd cars I've driven recently (Audi Quattros and Subaru WRX) have impressed me. If one gets a C4, are they looking at increased maintenance costs relative to a C2? If I am trying to stay below $25K, am I better off trying to find an '87-'89 Carerra (assuming I can't find a sub-100K C2/4 in my price range)?
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Old 08-18-2001, 11:35 PM
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Hello

In my opinion you may want to increase your budget if you want a C2 for a reliable daily driver. Others have touched on the improvements the 964 brings to the table and they are beneficial for daily driving. However, any ten year or older performance car is " at risk " to unanticipated repair issues, but I think it is wise to decrease the probabilities via condition, service history and total miles.

I mentioned in another post that I have a 1991 C2 that is documented, unmodified with 29,000 miles that I am considering selling... my advice above was not a sales pitch as I am on the "right" coast.

Good Luck!
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Old 08-20-2001, 12:15 AM
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Berkley's points above are very good.

If you would like to stay below $25k, it might be best to find a nice '84-'89 Carrera and keep some cash around for repairs. A high mileage 964 may be a good choice if there are good records, a PPI reveals no major problems and the the car is still in very nice shape. I'd still keep several thousand dollars in your budget for unexpected repairs.

What do you plan to use the 911 for? Daily driving? Track use?

I would not avoid the 1989 - 1991 cars at all. All of the mechanical faults of these cars (if even present) can be permanently corrected. I assume for normal street use a C4 shouldn't cost you too much more to run than a C2. The AWD system seems to be very reliable. 0-60 times are similar and top speed doesn't matter in the states. Lots of owners seem to love the C4 in inclement weather.

Good luck!

Jay
90 964
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Old 08-20-2001, 11:00 AM
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Randall G.
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Originally posted by Jay H:
<STRONG>***snip***

I would not avoid the 1989 - 1991 cars at all. All of the mechanical faults of these cars (if even present) can be permanently corrected.

***snip***
</STRONG>
I agree with Jay 100% ....
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Old 08-23-2001, 12:09 PM
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I am constantly surprised at the fear displayed by a lot of people with regards to high mileages. A C2 with 150k on the clock has no higher risk of breakdown than a 50k car, as long as the car has full service history. I purchased a 1990 C2 a few years back with 132k on the clock for 25% less than a car with 70k. The only reason for the difference in price is PERCEPTION by the 'market'. Any mechanic will tell you that there is no PHYSICAL reason for the difference. This car was excellent and performed very well. I owned it for a short time (about 18 months) and had to get rid of it as I needed the money for house.

I have in the last few weeks purchased another late 1990 C2 with 82k on the clock. I would gladly have purchased another high-miler, but this was the best I could find over the last few months. I certainly wouldn't touch a car that's 10-11 years old with only 29k on the clock. As you will know these cars need to be driven regularly to be at their best (and I would say 5k a year is an abolsute minimum), and the 29k car will presumably still have the original clutch in.

A friend of mine has a 91 C2 with 40k on the clock in which he as done only 3k in the last 2 years. As a result, the car has eaten 5 batteries (even though he disconnects it whenever he remembers), feels sluggish and is not very smooth. I am sure that most of these things will work themselves out once the car is driven over a period of time - but my message is DO NOT BE AFRAID OF MILEAGE.

One last point: my father's business partner has a 1990 C2 with 262k on the clock and has never broken down - just repairs for wear and tear.
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Old 08-23-2001, 12:11 PM
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Actually one post-last point: if you buy a 91 or earlier model (which by the way I own) just try and ascertain whether the flywheel has been replaced since new - as the design on these were crap. If not (and it may be with low milage cars that it hasn't been done), here in the UK it will cost around ú1500 to fix.
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