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Help Identify a barn find on CL

 
Old 01-08-2019, 04:49 AM
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Dorian Gothard
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Default Help Identify a barn find on CL

Hello, I'd like to just preface this by saying this is my first post on rennlist though I have used as a resource many times as a 996 owner. I found this interesting ad on CL and Im trying to figure out what exactly I am looking at. It appears to be a 930 turbo front bumper hanging from the rafters, I assume these are the original body panels before someone added some kind of fiberglass body kit? The car looks sort of like a RSR and a kremer 935k. The ad states the car is a 1973 911 but I believe it is at least 74/75 if those indeed are the original bumpers. Thats about all the info I could deduce but I'd love to hear anyones idea about what this thing is exactly.









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Old 01-08-2019, 06:08 PM
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FrenchToast
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Nothing says it isn't a '73. The only positive way to tell is with the VIN.

Back in the day, it was very common for people to change the body on their A-F car (thru '73) to resemble the G model, or a 964 or 993. G models were updated to 964 or 993 look, etc. Some air-cooled cars were even updated to 996 body panels (yes, really, I've seen them).

In the 80's everyone wanted a slantnose - many cars were changed to resemble a slant or a 935. Street cred was a function of shiny mesh wheels, fender slats, pop-up lights, a car phone, and the measured height of your stereo receiver and EQ system. Bonus cred was awarded for dash-mounted TVs and illuminated EQ bars.

This car looks like an unfinished race vehicle, not an inflate-my-street-cred boulevard cruiser. On the other hand, there is no cage; perhaps the slicks are just rollers.

The variety of body panels are probably from a previous iteration, or he/she couldn't decide the look they wanted.

Last edited by FrenchToast; 01-08-2019 at 06:24 PM.
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Old 01-08-2019, 07:52 PM
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Dorian Gothard
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Originally Posted by FrenchToast View Post
Nothing says it isn't a '73. The only positive way to tell is with the VIN.

Back in the day, it was very common for people to change the body on their A-F car (thru '73) to resemble the G model, or a 964 or 993. G models were updated to 964 or 993 look, etc. Some air-cooled cars were even updated to 996 body panels (yes, really, I've seen them).

In the 80's everyone wanted a slantnose - many cars were changed to resemble a slant or a 935. Street cred was a function of shiny mesh wheels, fender slats, pop-up lights, a car phone, and the measured height of your stereo receiver and EQ system. Bonus cred was awarded for dash-mounted TVs and illuminated EQ bars.

This car looks like an unfinished race vehicle, not an inflate-my-street-cred boulevard cruiser. On the other hand, there is no cage; perhaps the slicks are just rollers.

The variety of body panels are probably from a previous iteration, or he/she couldn't decide the look they wanted.

Being a late 90's baby I am woefully unaware of the intricacies of the 80's pop culture but I greatly appreciate it. I spoke to the gentleman who found listed it and he mentioned he found a 2.4 badge laying around, my understanding is that 1973 was the last year of the 2.4 motor and thus would corroborate the idea that those panels were not original. He also said the fenders had been cut for the new body panels, I assume for all intents and purposes that would make restoring the car unrealistic. The engine and trans are missing but the turbo you can barely see in one of the pictures is aftermarket, guess he was going for a turbo racecar?

I've never endeavored on building a racecar but I think it would be quite neat. I was told there isn't much in the way of rust but perhaps some DIY fabrication with the struct mounts may be the biggest issue with the car. Is this a redneck-stuttgart frankenstein experiment that should be put to rest or perfect opportunity to build a custom racecar? (within an hours drive of the VIR)
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Old 01-09-2019, 04:44 AM
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peterpullin
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rear reflector, bumpers, hoods, air filter are 1973 and on. but noboddy says this is the orignal parts for the shell.
so only fin will help. coyote ugly thing now. tons of money to build something nice. if it is no 73 2,7 carrera it
should be for parts only i fear...
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:42 AM
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tcsracing1
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looks to be tub and title.

Need a picture of the VIN and door post tag.
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Old 01-24-2019, 01:54 AM
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FrenchToast
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Originally Posted by Dorian Gothard View Post
Being a late 90's baby I am woefully unaware of the intricacies of the 80's pop culture but I greatly appreciate it. I spoke to the gentleman who found listed it and he mentioned he found a 2.4 badge laying around, my understanding is that 1973 was the last year of the 2.4 motor and thus would corroborate the idea that those panels were not original. He also said the fenders had been cut for the new body panels, I assume for all intents and purposes that would make restoring the car unrealistic. The engine and trans are missing but the turbo you can barely see in one of the pictures is aftermarket, guess he was going for a turbo racecar?

I've never endeavored on building a racecar but I think it would be quite neat. I was told there isn't much in the way of rust but perhaps some DIY fabrication with the struct mounts may be the biggest issue with the car. Is this a redneck-stuttgart frankenstein experiment that should be put to rest or perfect opportunity to build a custom racecar? (within an hours drive of the VIR)
You'd be surprised what some people "restore." Some 356 Speedsters have been "restored" from what was essentially a VIN plate. I'm not kidding.

That said, if the car is structurally sound, it is a great opportunity to build something the way you want it. If it is a '73, I think the floor and sills are galvanized, so that should have warded off some rust over the years (galvanization does not make it invincible).

To learn to drive a 911 I would start with a low-power engine. If you want to do regular track events, the chassis does have some weak points (its a fifty year old design!), but shouldn't require much if you have minimal downforce and keep the horsepower modest. Over 400hp and more downforce and you'd be advised to investigate 935 suspension components.
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Old 01-28-2019, 05:49 PM
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Dorian Gothard
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Someone else came and bought the car the day after the ad was posted, so I never had a chance. Not to worry though, honestly I was more curious than anything else. I would love to get a good chassis and build a track toy from the ground up but being a full time student thats not easy for me to do.
I do, however, have experience driving a 911. Owned a 996 C2 6mt coupe for a while and that thing was a blast. Had the later 3.6L and no traction control at all so it was awesome as a daily driver in the rain and occasional snow here in NC.

I appreciated everyones help and vast knowledge on this little inquiry.
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