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Tesla M3D review: split decision

Old 10-04-2018, 03:33 AM
  #61  
Jason Zhang
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Originally Posted by Petevb View Post
Are you on the stock 18s?
yea, i think it is some sort of high-efficiency tires with the model 3s come with.
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:08 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by Jason Zhang View Post
yea, i think it is some sort of high-efficiency tires with the model 3s come with.
The stock 18s are very, very far from a performance tire. Even the 19s are well below what Porsche typically equips. I would think about a set of rims (19s or 20s) and some real rubber. The 20” Michelin that is optional on the Performance model looks like an impressive compromise; it would transform the handling. It also seems like additional grip may make the stability control more consistent.

A comparison between the 18s and 19s (personally I still find the 19s somewhat underwhelming, so I’d try to upgrade past that if you do make a change):
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Old 10-04-2018, 12:39 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by Jason Zhang View Post
Going from a Macan S to a model 3 RWD my biggest disappointment is the steering of Tesla, and two other small ones are the lack of traction in Tesla and you can't turn off the traction control in model 3. I think it would have been way more fun if I can turn off the traction control (then I can slide around a bit when I wish). I once tried to corner at a relatively fast speed and then in the middle of the corner give it some "gas", then the rear wheel surprisingly managed to lose traction and the car started to go sideways for like half a second. Next, the traction control fixed it. I was very surprised that the model 3 has enough power for the rear wheels to lose traction, and I wasn't even going full throttle when it happened.
On the "Driving" menu, you can select "Sport" to give the steering some extra weight. You can also select "Slip start" to partially turn off the traction control nanny. And yes, the stock tires are decent daily drivers, but definitely not track worthy.

Folks who purchased the Performance+ version of the P3D will be getting a "Track mode" option with the V9 software update. It is due out in the next week or two. Apparently it provides the driver a lot of control over traction control and other things.
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Old 10-04-2018, 01:36 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by whiz944 View Post
On the "Driving" menu, you can select "Sport" to give the steering some extra weight. You can also select "Slip start" to partially turn off the traction control nanny. And yes, the stock tires are decent daily drivers, but definitely not track worthy.

Folks who purchased the Performance+ version of the P3D will be getting a "Track mode" option with the V9 software update. It is due out in the next week or two. Apparently it provides the driver a lot of control over traction control and other things.
That is one thing car fans will have to realize, unlike before when you had to make hardware changes to your car to get certain changes, many times if what you are asking for makes it to the manufacturer, they can make software changes for you to add features that you and they think the hardware can handle. Sure you already do software changes to modern cars, but the electric cars have far more functions under computer control.

Right now we see Tesla already doing it for their cars, but by next year I expect both Porsche and Jaguar to listen to their customers and add more options to how their car can handle.

I understand that charging speed will increase on the I-Pace with just a software change for example.

Think carefully, who knows what you can do to make you car better in the future with the right software update.

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Old 10-04-2018, 02:50 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by earl pottinger View Post
That is one thing car fans will have to realize, unlike before when you had to make hardware changes to your car to get certain changes, many times if what you are asking for makes it to the manufacturer, they can make software changes for you to add features that you and they think the hardware can handle. Sure you already do software changes to modern cars, but the electric cars have far more functions under computer control.

Right now we see Tesla already doing it for their cars, but by next year I expect both Porsche and Jaguar to listen to their customers and add more options to how their car can handle.

I understand that charging speed will increase on the I-Pace with just a software change for example.

Think carefully, who knows what you can do to make you car better in the future with the right software update.
Tesla has been doing over-the-air updates of the cars since Roadster days. For example if you bought a Model S in 2012, it is usually running the latest software updates - with many features and performance enhancements added along the way. In the case of my Model 3, there have been three updates just since I bought it in July. They included a few new features and some internal autopilot enhancements. The upcoming v9 is going to have a lot of new features in it, in particular bringing some displays (energy display, web browser, etc) that the Model S/X have had to the Model 3 - harmonizing the software and UI. Also some major new navigation and autopilot features. (And, of course, "track mode" for P3D+ owners.) The update process does ask you for permission and typically does it at 3 AM (user adjustable.) It is conceivable that there are a few owners who don't allow their cars to be updated. But IMHO one would be silly not to.
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:59 PM
  #66  
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Update: I just completed a quick work trip to Bakersfield with my model 3: ~540 miles round trip. At the speeds I was traveling at (on the high end of traffic) the car was getting 77% of the advertised range per mile, so 240 miles instead of the nominal 310. This meant that even if I'd started with a full charge (I didn't) I could not have made one way without stopping at a supercharger without slowing down.

Luckily there were 6 well placed superchargers along the route to choose from. As the hotel I stayed at didn't have charging I made use of four of them to complete the trip. I could easily have done it in two, but more shorter stops seem better- they not only break the trip up but the car charges much faster when the battery is empty vs full.

Total time at superchargers was roughly an hour and 20 minutes, but I returned with 150 miles of range left, so I could have cut this to an hour flat if I'd been trying. Compare this with 1-2 gas stops in a typical car and you get a difference of around +50 minutes on a 7 hour drive time trip, though in all likelihood I'd also have driven slightly faster in a gas car in some areas rather than watching my speed for range. Overall I suspect taking the Tesla (to a hotel that didn't have overnight charging) added an hour to the trip.

In this case I had an hour to spare, and much of that time was spent grabbing breakfast or lunch- very smooth overall. Had I been more pressed for time it could easily have been a problem. Overall I consider it a success. I'll try to find a hotel with overnight charging next time, but even without that I'll try to take the Tesla over our Audi next time... assuming I've got the extra ~45 minutes or so to spare. For this type of use charging speed really does matter, and Porsche's 800V offering will be welcome if it's widely available. I saw an indicated 463 mph charge rate at one stop, but even at that pace the charge time adds up.
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:44 PM
  #67  
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When you get your Taycan can you do the same trip and post a link back to your previous post at the same time?

Present info say the Taycan has shorter range, but at 800 Volts the charging will go a lot lot faster, so how will this balance out?

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Old 10-11-2018, 11:14 PM
  #68  
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When you get your Taycan can you do the same trip and post a link back to your previous post at the same time?

Present info say the Taycan has shorter range, but at 800 Volts the charging will go a lot lot faster, so how will this balance out?

Earl Colby Pottinger (Tesla and Bollinger fan)
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:35 PM
  #69  
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I've found 1-2 supercharger stops/day to really not be a problem and not significantly change the over drive time - and given the infrequency of it the advantages of an EV overrule the occasional road trip problems - as documented in my 1820 mile trip with the Model X this past summer.

the real question is the availability of fast chargers and Tesla has a huge lead…and it's getting bigger.
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Old 10-12-2018, 01:16 AM
  #70  
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Originally Posted by Petevb View Post
Update: I just completed a quick work trip to Bakersfield with my model 3: ~540 miles round trip. At the speeds I was traveling at (on the high end of traffic) the car was getting 77% of the advertised range per mile, so 240 miles instead of the nominal 310. This meant that even if I'd started with a full charge (I didn't) I could not have made one way without stopping at a supercharger without slowing down.
I always stop for food at either Harris Ranch or Kettleman in an ICE vehicle. So for me there would be no difference between ICE or Tesla.

Luckily there were 6 well placed superchargers along the route to choose from. As the hotel I stayed at didn't have charging I made use of four of them to complete the trip. I could easily have done it in two, but more shorter stops seem better- they not only break the trip up but the car charges much faster when the battery is empty vs full.
Yes! The charge rate starts to taper after the battery is like 60-70% charged. Beyond about 80% you may as well be using L2 charging. (People have charted this in detail over on the TMC forum. I'm speaking more generally.) So the game for optimal drive time is to make it as far as you can on the initial charge. Then charge enough to stay below the taper point - yet make it to the next Supercharger with some cushion. If the battery is big enough, or in the case of I-5 where the Supercharger sites are somewhat closely spaced, you can skip a Supercharger or two - while still charging at max speed.

Total time at superchargers was roughly an hour and 20 minutes, but I returned with 150 miles of range left, so I could have cut this to an hour flat if I'd been trying.
Your goal is to arrive home with _way_ fewer than 150 miles remaining. That is about 50% charged!

It is too bad you didn't stay at a place that offered Destination Charging. There is one place in L.A. that I stay at a lot. Last time I was there, I talked with the manager about how great it would be if they offered some charging facilities for EV drivers. Some of his competitors have already done so. He was quite interested - so we'll see if it turns into anything.

Also it never hurts to just ask at the front desk. Sometimes the maintenance guy can find a 120v receptacle you can plug in to. Even a lowly 5-15 receptacle will give you 30-40 miles of charge overnight. Note that these are usually 20 amp receptacles, so the optional 5-20 adapter may be a good thing to carry in your charging kit to kick it up to more like 50-60 miles.
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