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Who has original coolant pipes that have made it past 150,000 miles?

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Who has original coolant pipes that have made it past 150,000 miles?

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Old 03-10-2018, 04:34 PM
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Rod Croskery
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Default Who has original coolant pipes that have made it past 150,000 miles?

It's part of the accepted narrative about Cayennes on this site that the plastic coolant pipes do not or even cannot last much past 60,000 miles (96,500 km). I wonder if that is the case in both warm and cold climates?

If you please, let me know if your plastic pipes are holding up at over 100,000 miles, and where your Cayenne lives with regard to temperature.

To begin, my son and I have '04 CS models, both with about 150,000 km. So far everything is fine down under. They came from Southern B.C. to Eastern Ontario in the last year.

Rod Croskery '04 CS
Portand, Ontario

Charlie Croskery '04 CS
Ottawa, Ontario
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Old 03-10-2018, 06:24 PM
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hahnmgh63
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If you have plastic coolant pipes change them now. Why would you take a chance and wait until they would blow and leave you stranded? Why would you take a chance that they start leaking slowly and leak on the Torque Converter and then the TC seal fails?
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Old 03-10-2018, 08:02 PM
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Wisconsin Joe
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Mine has lived in Wisconsin (US) it's entire life. I was not aware that climate had anything to do with their durability.

It had about 104k miles on it when I did the pipes.

When they came out they were very weak and brittle.

I could break pieces off the end with my thumb and forefinger. And not a whole lot of effort.
I don't know how much longer they would have lasted, but I would guess "not much longer".

150k kms is about 93k miles. If they've lasted this long, I would bet they won't last a whole lot longer.

When they go, they will give the starter a bath. Generally, that bath will result in the starter crapping out about 6 months later, if you don't replace along with the pipes.
They will also dump coolant down the back of the engine, which will get it all over the back end of the crankshaft/trans input shaft. Unless it's rinsed off fairly well, the dried coolant will leave a rough 'crystally' residue that will chew up the torque converter seal.
That requires dropping the trans to replace.

Your car, your choice. But the general consensus is that pipes are a "when" issue, not an "if" issue.
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Old 03-10-2018, 10:44 PM
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On my first CTT, an 05 the coolant pipes lasted about 80,000 km and the Ts failed at 150,000km. On my 06 CTTS I replaced both the coolant pipes and the Ts at 80,000km BEFORE they failed. To put it bluntly, only a fool waits till they fail if they know they haven't been replaced. I am saying it this way because people still don't replace even when they know they will fail. This is a no brainer! Cheers.
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Old 03-11-2018, 09:20 AM
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Rod Croskery
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It had about 104k miles on it when I did the pipes.

When they came out they were very weak and brittle.


Joe:

That's useful information. Thanks.

Rod
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Old 03-11-2018, 11:22 AM
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Do not pass go, don't collect $200! In fact, shell out a lot more than $200 if they break. Anyone reading that hasn't done this work, get the parts, get a few semi-specialized tools, and with the help of this forum... dive in!!! These are such great machines when you fix the few issues they have and care for them well.
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Old 03-11-2018, 01:20 PM
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As Matt O indicates the job is not overwhelming, especially on the S without the coolant Ts. There is an awesome step by step on ECS. http://bd8ba3c866c8cbc330ab-7b26c6f3..._Upgrade_2.pdf
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Old 03-11-2018, 02:22 PM
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So far there's a convincing level of unanimity on this topic. I'm convinced.

Next question has to do with the various kits for the job. Is there any qualitative advantage to buying a mid-level aftermarket kit rather than the lowest-priced version of the aluminum coolant tubes?

Why I ask is that I bought a pair of lower front control arms from Amazon.com for $99. each. They're on, they work, and the car aligned well, but they required quite a lot of fitting with an angle grinder to install. On the other hand our JIMI Fix on the drive shaft support bearing went on well and works beautifully.

My main worry is that I'll get the car apart, tying up the garage and hoist, and I'll discover a missing washer or broken piece to hold the job up until I can order it.
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Old 03-11-2018, 02:53 PM
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If you read through the sticky thread, and go through a couple of the writeups (ECS, Pelican, ect), you will see all the parts that are needed.

The kits usually have everything you need, but make sure.

One thing to beware of:

The genuine Porsche pipes are a bit smaller than the aftermarket ones. It makes getting the starter in and out without pulling the pipes easier (if that ever is needed).
The aftermarket pipes are often Hamburg-Technic. Those are made in China and have a history of issues with the quality of the castings.

The Porsche pipes are more expensive than the aftermarket (duh), but not terribly so.
Considering the labor involved in changing them if they are faulty, I went with the more expensive Porsche ones myself.

Your car, your choice, but I would strongly suggest doing your research on this before deciding which ones to go with.
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Old 03-11-2018, 03:24 PM
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The aftermarket pipes are often Hamburg-Technic. Those are made in China and have a history of issues with the quality of the castings.
I recall reading about one guy who had to return the pipes due to the casting flaw (pinhole)...maybe I missed other posts, were there more? I do know ECS found a "handful" with that spot, scrapped them and claimed to pressure test all new sets.
That was about THREE years ago. I would think it's safe to say that minor issue is long gone. Personally, I rather take the $400 saved over the Porsche kit and put it towards future maintenance or something fun like a new NAV head-unit with MOST adapter and still have enough left over for a few tanks of gas.
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Old 03-11-2018, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by 19psi View Post
I recall reading about one guy who had to return the pipes due to the casting flaw (pinhole)...maybe I missed other posts, were there more? I do know ECS found a "handful" with that spot, scrapped them and claimed to pressure test all new sets.
That was about THREE years ago. I would think it's safe to say that minor issue is long gone. Personally, I rather take the $400 saved over the Porsche kit and put it towards future maintenance or something fun like a new NAV head-unit with MOST adapter and still have enough left over for a few tanks of gas.
Well, search around the rest of the 'net, and you will find more info. Chinese quality control has long been spotty. It's improved, but it's still an issue.

The vendors and manufacturer claimed it was only a 'handful' and continue to sell them.

I tend to be skeptical of those sorts of claims.

When I got mine, about 3 years ago, the issue was still fresh.
And the price difference was a lot less.

As I noted, the OP should do his own research and make his own choices.
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Old 03-11-2018, 07:06 PM
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There is zero chance I would skimp on price point for the aluminum pipe repair on a Cayenne. My recommendation is to go OEM on this one.
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Old 03-11-2018, 08:45 PM
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Well, search around the rest of the 'net, and you will find more info.
Ok, I just did. I found multiple posts on quite a few forums...all by the same guy who goes by dugahole55. Can you point to just one other person who had to replace an aftermarket pipe?
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Old 03-12-2018, 11:30 AM
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Pipes specifically? Not with a quick search. I think I remember more than one incident, but it was three years ago.

Lots of other H-T stuff? Yes.

You have done your research and seem comfortable with them. Great.

When I got mine, there were enough questions that I wasn't comfortable with them.

Personally, for something like this, both this critical and this labor intensive, I wasn't willing to take the chance.

Maybe the issue was overblown. Maybe it's fixed. Maybe not.
Again, your car, your choice. But I would suggest that any one do their research and make intelligent, informed choices.

If a particular person chooses H-T pipes, I'd love to hear that they have no issues with them. It would be nice to have decent, reliable alternatives to original factory parts (not that the aluminum ones are really "original).
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Old 03-13-2018, 09:00 PM
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Hi all - I just picked up a very nice 06 S with 80k. Upgrade from an aging Suburban, and plan to use as tow rig for my 951s to track days once the snow melts here in NY. Well cared for Cayenne S with air suspension, and everything works as it should but looks like the original plastic pipes are still in place (which was a bit surprising as the original owner had it serviced by Fairfield Porsche and I thought this would have gotten caught up in the class action).

In any event, I just ordered a coolant pipe kit from Suncoast Porsche - competitive pricing at just under $750 shipped with 2 gal of Porsche coolant. All genuine Porsche parts, and also installing a rebuilt starter while i'm in there. I thought about aftermarket pipes, but I think genuine Porsche is the best bet with certain parts, especially when there is a lot of labor involved (such as 951 engine mounts). Just my $.02 from doing my own wrenching for 35 years.

Looks like a bit of a project but can't be worse than last winter's project of re-ringing and installing rod bearings on the 951. It's also not my DD so no pressure to get it done in a day.
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