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Does anyone use anti-seize on their wheel bolts?

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Does anyone use anti-seize on their wheel bolts?

 
Old 09-25-2013, 07:46 PM
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9115INGH
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Default Does anyone use anti-seize on their wheel bolts?

Hey,

Just wondering if anyone uses any kind of anti-sieze on their wheel bolts?

I have some titanium ones and was wondering if it makes any difference to whether i should or not.

KJ
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Old 09-25-2013, 07:58 PM
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TT Surgeon
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I believe tikore recommends it on ti bolts, not sure if it makes a difference.
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Old 09-25-2013, 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by TT Surgeon View Post
I believe tikore recommends it on ti bolts, not sure if it makes a difference.
Porsche recommends too.
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Old 09-25-2013, 09:14 PM
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MLindgren
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There should be a different torque spec if using anti-seize.

Do titanium lug bolts use the same torque spec as steel to insure proper bolt stretch?
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Old 09-25-2013, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by MLindgren View Post
There should be a different torque spec if using anti-seize.

Do titanium lug bolts use the same torque spec as steel to insure proper bolt stretch?
The owner's manual only lists 1 torque spec which I assumes includes the recommendation to use Optimoly.
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Old 09-25-2013, 11:49 PM
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ilko
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I've been using white lithium grease on the wheel lugs/bolts on all of my cars for over 10 years. I don't torque them any differently, never had a seized wheel, and have yet to experience a wheel fall off
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Old 09-26-2013, 02:06 AM
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I use a moly-based anti-seize just as my manual tells me to. I only fully torque the bolts after lowering the wheel to the ground. Yada, yada, yada.

Do I think either of these matter? Not really. Before I bought an expensive car--for me at least--I never used anti-seize, and I tightened as much as seemed necessary using a lug wrench--no torque wrenches involved. Never had any problems of any kind--abnormal tire wear, vibration, seized lug nuts, etc.

My Dad laughs at how I have to pamper my cars these days. He and I both grew up on steel wheels and jacks that you crank up with a lug wrench before you pry off the hubcap and break the lug nuts loose--if you had a hubcap. Some of the old pickup trucks we jacked up by the bumper, IIRC.

And weeeeeee liked it!
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Old 09-26-2013, 03:20 AM
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Why take a chance? The manual says use anti-sieze. It doesn't take that much effort.
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Old 09-26-2013, 05:52 AM
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This is from the Owners manual guys, Optimoly TA is the way to go :

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Old 09-26-2013, 09:14 AM
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Good info and timely! Swapping my Turbo II wheels out for my GT3 RS wheels on Friday. I'll follow the recommendations. Thanks.
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Old 09-26-2013, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by L_perm View Post
I
Do I think either of these matter? Not really. Before I bought an expensive car--for me at least--I never used anti-seize, and I tightened as much as seemed necessary using a lug wrench--no torque wrenches involved. Never had any problems of any kind--abnormal tire wear, vibration, seized lug nuts, etc.
The issue is dissimilar materials and galling.
If your torquing up a steel lug to a steel wheel, no issues. Tightening up a "dry" aluminum fastener to a steel stud could result in galling which will seize the aluminum fastener. Sod's Law dictates that you will discover this when you get a flat tire on a dark, rainy night miles from civilization
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Old 09-27-2013, 01:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Metal Guru View Post
The issue is dissimilar materials and galling.
If your torquing up a steel lug to a steel wheel, no issues. Tightening up a "dry" aluminum fastener to a steel stud could result in galling which will seize the aluminum fastener. Sod's Law dictates that you will discover this when you get a flat tire on a dark, rainy night miles from civilization
Ha! Good point--dissimilar metals doing their chemical shenanigans. I guess back when we were using dry nuts and lug wrenches we didn't have any of those fancy new metals like aluminum on our wheels.

And weeeeeee liked it!
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