Notices
997 Forum
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Opinions needed ‘05 C2S IMS bearing concern

 
Old 04-14-2019, 09:31 PM
  #1  
Vietjdmboi
User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Anaheim
Posts: 10
Default Opinions needed ‘05 C2S IMS bearing concern

Hey fellow members! I am looking to purchase my first Porsche and found a 2005 C2S with 27k miles. My only concern with it is the possibility of an ims bearing failure. Looking at the vin tag it shows 6/05 so I wasn’t sure if that falls outside of the range for the bad bearing.

I have asked my salesman to look further into this to see if the car had it replaced or if I’m safe and would not need to worry about it.

What do you guy think?

Here he is a link to the car

https://www.porschenewportbeach.com/...9177dedd2e.htm


Since
Vietjdmboi is offline  
Old 04-15-2019, 06:16 PM
  #2  
jkw911
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
jkw911's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,212
Default

That looks like an awesome example. The wheels are on the bling side for my taste but I’d say a very good opportunity.
jkw911 is offline  
Old 04-15-2019, 06:25 PM
  #3  
JoshGordon
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 26
Default

General consensus is that the larger bearing began to be used in 3/05 and later builds, so that car "should" be outside of the high failure range. The larger bearing can still fail but seems to happen at a much, much lower rate.

You can Google for the exact build dates and also for the engine numbers of the affected vehicles - the engine numbers are easy to see even without putting the car on a lift so you could ask the dealer to snap a pic of it for further confirmation.

I'm researching options for IMS replacement for my 11/04 build right now so getting very familiar with all this stuff.
JoshGordon is offline  
Old 04-15-2019, 07:20 PM
  #4  
street rod
User
 
street rod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,536
Default

You cannot go by the engine numbers or build date. It has been proven that these sometimes are wrong. The only way to be sure is to look. Check the nut or the IMS flange. If the center nut of the IMS flange is a 13mm hex then it's the old style bearing and can be replaced without splitting the case. If it's a 22mm nut then it's the new larger updated bearing which is generally considered reliable and does not need to be replaced.
street rod is offline  
Old 04-16-2019, 12:33 AM
  #5  
drmain1
User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 38
Default

Let me know if you end up driving this vehicle. I called the dealer to talk to them about this car and I wasn't really impressed with the answers they gave me. It does look gorgeous!
drmain1 is offline  
Old 04-16-2019, 08:55 AM
  #6  
Charles Navarro
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Charles Navarro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Momence, IL
Posts: 1,027
Default

Originally Posted by Vietjdmboi View Post
Hey fellow members! I am looking to purchase my first Porsche and found a 2005 C2S with 27k miles. My only concern with it is the possibility of an ims bearing failure. Looking at the vin tag it shows 6/05 so I wasn’t sure if that falls outside of the range for the bad bearing.

I have asked my salesman to look further into this to see if the car had it replaced or if I’m safe and would not need to worry about it.

What do you guy think?

Here he is a link to the car

https://www.porschenewportbeach.com/...9177dedd2e.htm


Since
Looks like a very nice car. I wouldn't be too concerned with the IMS. Have a PPI done to check for scoring, sump and filter inspection, etc.

What I would plan on doing is pulling the gearbox regardless of what bearing it has. If it has the serviceable bearing, you can change it. If not, you can remove the grease seal to help extend the life of the original bearing. It's a win-win regardless.

http://imsretrofit.com/my06-08/
Charles Navarro is offline  
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - About Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: