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How do you set up your seat, pedals and mirrors?

 
Old 05-25-2007, 01:49 PM
  #16  
ZombiePorsche44
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Originally Posted by axl911
Sitting close feels good, but has anyone notice how close their knees are to the knee pad? When I looked at the knee pad, it just a sheet of steel. In a collision, you knee hitting that would not be good. Just wondering if this is a safety issue.

--
anthony

Crashing is the only real safety issue here, don't crash and your knees will be just fine!

ZP44
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Old 05-25-2007, 01:57 PM
  #17  
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During a frontal crash your right leg will be pressed against the brake pedal, fully flexed. Your femur will mostly likely break due to this pad, the tibia & fibia may snap, too. Your left leg may get mashed if you've got the clutch pedal fully depressed (natural reaction to braking hard)... Why would you be worried about your knees?
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Old 05-25-2007, 03:12 PM
  #18  
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I have my mirror adjusted so i only see the "hips" in them.

who is going to catch me anyway ?

Eggert
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Old 05-25-2007, 03:20 PM
  #19  
axl911
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"During a frontal crash your right leg will be pressed against the brake pedal, fully flexed. Your femur will mostly likely break due to this pad, the tibia & fibia may snap, too. Your left leg may get mashed if you've got the clutch pedal fully depressed (natural reaction to braking hard)... Why would you be worried about your knees?"

:0

So...why is the metal knee pad there and sticking out so far and forming an edge? In most modern cars I've seen, the knee pad is pushed back and is made of plastic & foam.
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Old 05-25-2007, 04:25 PM
  #20  
993James993
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I adjusted my seat forward as suggested here. Wow! What a difference. Thanks everyone!!!
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Old 05-25-2007, 05:08 PM
  #21  
Butzi
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Originally Posted by axl911
"During a frontal crash your right leg will be pressed against the brake pedal, fully flexed. Your femur will mostly likely break due to this pad, the tibia & fibia may snap, too. Your left leg may get mashed if you've got the clutch pedal fully depressed (natural reaction to braking hard)... Why would you be worried about your knees?"

:0

So...why is the metal knee pad there and sticking out so far and forming an edge? In most modern cars I've seen, the knee pad is pushed back and is made of plastic & foam.
That's what I learned 15 years ago when getting my EMT certification (did not work in that field, however)... Not sure how it applies anymore with the advancement of safety design. Lexus and others have added "knee airbags" to their list of safety features...
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Old 01-09-2008, 02:17 PM
  #22  
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Both P cars I have modded for the track I had the seats put as low in the car as possible. I need the head room. I usually have to have custom made seat mounts to do this. In my old RSA we built custom angled sliders and moved the computer to get the seat down on the floor. We could accomidate a 6'6" driver down to 5'. As you moved the seat forward the seat would move up. Worked pretty well. Low is good
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Old 01-09-2008, 05:07 PM
  #23  
Edward
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Originally Posted by chris walrod View Post
For track driving, set your seat in a position to where you can rest one wrist at the top of the steering wheel without having to lean forward. This provides proper leverage on the wheel. Its certainly tough to do for tall people. This is why so many folks, myself included, wish for the wheel to be moved aft, which avoids one to have to splay their legs apart to 'fit' the car.

Also, your shifting arm shouldnt be fully extended to make the upshift to fifth gear (left hand drive).
Yup. And as ZP44 mentioned, once you get used to it, you'll never drive "reclined" (okay, "ghetto" ) again. The bottom line is you want maximum control over your steering wheel/pedals/gearshift (and leverage on the steering wheel) when you need to evade or correct on the track; that would be an "emergency" situation on the street.

As for mirrors, I have the tiniest of a sliver of the body visible in the mirror so as to maximize my view of what's around me. And you don't need to see any more than a sliver of sky in your mirror ...all you need to see is road and what's on it.

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Old 01-09-2008, 05:14 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Edward View Post
Yup. And as ZP44 mentioned, once you get used to it, you'll never drive "reclined" (okay, "ghetto" ) again. The bottom line is you want maximum control over your steering wheel/pedals/gearshift (and leverage on the steering wheel) when you need to evade or correct on the track; that would be an "emergency" situation on the street.

As for mirrors, I have the tiniest of a sliver of the body visible in the mirror so as to maximize my view of what's around me. And you don't need to see any more than a sliver of sky in your mirror ...all you need to see is road and what's on it.

Edward
+1

From BWM Racing School:

Lean your head over until it almost touches the driver's window, and then position the side mirror on the car's left side so you can just see the rear quarterpanel (the rear of the car) in the mirror. Note this will have it positioned farther out than you probably had it before.

Lean your head to be just between the two front seats, at your normal height, and position the right side mirror so you can just see the rear quarterpanel of the passenger side in the mirror.

Adjust the center rearview mirror to place it facing the center of the rear window.

While driving note that a car passing you begins in the center of your rearview mirror. As it approaches you, it moves to the side of your center rear view mirror, and at the same time appears in your side mirror. This shows you that there is no rear blind spot, because there is an overlap between the mirrors.

Also note that your side mirrors now capture a tremendous additional amount of information about what is in the lanes immediately next to your car. Previously you would have to turn your head to ensure nothing was in the lanes beside your car before changing lanes.

Now, your side mirrors do a much better job of covering this blind spot on the side.
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