Notices
991
Sponsored by:

Wadding depth 991.2

 
Old 10-21-2018, 11:59 PM
  #16  
Pointbye
User
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 122
Default

I just want to know how you plan on measuring this depth before driving through?
Pointbye is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 02:21 AM
  #17  
BSO
User
 
BSO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 258
Default

I would say be proactive and use your truck if there is any hint of heavy rain/flash floods.

I wouldn't drive a low clearance car through anything deeper than a puddle or standing water that you can see is shallow.

If I were faced with a large stretch of water on the street, two choices, look at cars that are crossing to gauge depth or detour.

Be aware, there are a**holes that love to drive through these conditions at speed and set off a bow wave that could easily swamp you. Seen it many times.
BSO is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 02:32 AM
  #18  
Spyerx
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Spyerx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: SoCal
Posts: 12,161
Default

No more than a few inches. Keep in mind how low your radiators and engine case and exhaust are.

Spyerx is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 03:11 AM
  #19  
stout
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
stout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: ^ The Bay Bridge, Silly
Posts: 3,504
Default ~

Originally Posted by BSO View Post
I would say be proactive and use your truck if there is any hint of heavy rain/flash floods.

I wouldn't drive a low clearance car through anything deeper than a puddle or standing water that you can see is shallow.

If I were faced with a large stretch of water on the street, two choices, look at cars that are crossing to gauge depth or detour.

Be aware, there are a**holes that love to drive through these conditions at speed and set off a bow wave that could easily swamp you. Seen it many times.
^ This.

I remember seeing a BMW 750iL in the parking lot at a shop in Santa Barbara years ago, after the floods there in 1995~, with a sign in the window that said it was totaled. It was still pretty new, and looked perfect. Hydrolocked, thanks to the low air inlets + flood waters.

Porsche is at least smarter that way, but I still wouldn't take the chance. If I had to drive a 911 in those conditions, I'd be giving Leh Keen a call...
stout is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 09:10 AM
  #20  
Hurricane
Super User
 
Hurricane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 3,444
Default

Hurricane is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 10:19 AM
  #21  
flsupraguy
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
flsupraguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 689
Default

You gain a few more inches of wadding if you install a duck tail on your 911...
flsupraguy is online now  
Old 10-22-2018, 10:45 AM
  #22  
murphyslaw1978
Super User
 
murphyslaw1978's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 4,699
Default

I used to drive right through flooded areas when I was a teen using various cars, but today, I purposely go around even lowly puddles.

That said, the 911 can probably safely go through 6” of water. The ground clearance is what’s most important here. You want to be aware of items in the car that sit the lowest and how wet the car was before wading through. Driving slowly through 6” is different than trying to barrel through 4”. Would the 911 be able to wade through deeper water in an emergency or accidentally? Most certainly. I would try to avoid that though, because water can start to cause havoc with electronics, the clutch, brakes, and even the engine case will now be partially submerged, putting temperature stresses on the metal that really would rather have a uniform temperature. And then of course, you could start to get water into the cabin if the water level is higher than the door sills. On my 996, the computer sits under the driver seat, and it’s really important not to get that thing flooded. The cost to replace those computers is high. I would also not want to flood the crank position sensor, assuming that sensor is relatively low in the car.

In torrential downpour situations, though, many of these car parts get wet anyway, so as long as the connections are healthy - many of the connections have water resistance plugs, o-rings, protection, you should be just fine. An old car, or one driven in all seasons over many years might start having issues after rain events.

The air intake on the 996 and probably your car too, is well past 12-18” above ground, so that’s not a concern, and neither is massive water ingestation pouring over the top of the outside rear deck lid in a torrential downpour. The air intake is designed with a filter housing that has holes in the bottom to drain water, and air must be routed upwards past the filter, so even if water does get in, the gravity of the water would not allow it to be lifted with with air past the filter. So water into the engine is not an issue.
murphyslaw1978 is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 11:03 AM
  #23  
J**2
Addict
Rennlist Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 86
Default Thanks

thanks for all the information guys. You rule.
J**2 is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 01:10 PM
  #24  
neil.schneider
User
 
neil.schneider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New Jersey(outside Phila)
Posts: 884
Default

If you were to go to a deep puddle that cover your exhaust pipes, you would have to be very careful not to let off the gas. Of you were to let of the throttle then water could get sucked in. My understanding is to proceed slowly and continue to give it gas the whole way across. If the water is over the exhaust and you let up then you will likely get stuck. I had heard what usually happens, is that people start into the puddle doing ok. When they get to the middle and it gets deeper they are like ”oh ****” and let off the gas and then get stuck. This was told to me by a fireman. He said they get a lot of calls like this.
neil.schneider is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 01:11 PM
  #25  
neil.schneider
User
 
neil.schneider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New Jersey(outside Phila)
Posts: 884
Default

Funny thread btw.
neil.schneider is offline  
Old 10-22-2018, 02:24 PM
  #26  
Penn4S
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
Penn4S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Pennsylvania.
Posts: 2,450
Default

I would say just never take the car out if these conditions are called for. It is not worth swamping the car and then it is yours for life as no one will want it.
Penn4S is online now  
Old 10-22-2018, 02:43 PM
  #27  
achtung6
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
achtung6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mill Valley, CA
Posts: 212
Default

Originally Posted by Penn4S View Post
I would say just never take the car out if these conditions are called for. It is not worth swamping the car and then it is yours for life as no one will want it.
I have to agree with this. My brother works at an M-B dealership and they get waterlogged engines all the time. It's a disaster. The OP has a nice truck that can wade through deep water easily. Just avoid driving the 991.
achtung6 is offline  
Old 10-23-2018, 12:40 PM
  #28  
digits
Addict
Rennlist Member
 
digits's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 462
Default

Originally Posted by achtung6 View Post
I have to agree with this. My brother works at an M-B dealership and they get waterlogged engines all the time. It's a disaster. The OP has a nice truck that can wade through deep water easily. Just avoid driving the 991.
The funny responses are just rennlist being rennlist - but there is a serious aspect to the question. Going slowly in a couple inches of water isn't something I'd really want to do with a 911 - but another aspect of the question is how fast you can go in the wet even if it's just heavy rain. I don't know if this is common (and I'm not trying to bash MB) but apparently the intakes on some MB models actually make them susceptible to hydrolock. Just google for "amg mercedes hydrolock". Or start here - it's a sad story - https://mbworld.org/forums/c63-c63s-...ocked-c63.html

digits is offline  
Old 10-23-2018, 03:18 PM
  #29  
BSO
User
 
BSO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 258
Default

In:re the MB hydro lock, there's a live action video on the net of a gentleman and his close-to-new high-end AMG Merc, whose car stalls out in the middle of a rainstorm and has to get gets towed away with a dead motor.

It goes to document his hydro locked motor saga dealing w/ Mercedes and whose responsible. Comment on the video include those that state the driver drove too fast or in too deep water and it's his fault (there's a gap in the live video, from running to not running, where there may be "questions" on what actually happened.

Needless to say a likely avoidable occurrence, wouldn't want to chance it.
BSO is offline  
Old 10-23-2018, 11:03 PM
  #30  
Gh0st0
User
 
Gh0st0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Midwest
Posts: 227
Default

Autovlog is known to make videos very click baity too
Gh0st0 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - About Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: