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"Paddle Neutral"

 
Old 09-10-2015, 05:16 AM
  #16  
Need4S
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Originally Posted by worf928 View Post
This evening I played around with it. Under all circumstances if I pull and immediately release the paddles (think mouse click here) my TT always goes to neutral. If I pull and hold it does nothing. So, for the folks that can't make it work, my only thought is that you're not releasing the paddles. Or, you've got rogue PDK software. Umm... because we can put it in neutral. And without moving our hands from the wheel. If that isn't sufficient how about this:
Immediately releasing the paddles worked! But if you are stopped or near stopped, it won't go back into gear without your foot on the brake. It also seems to re-engage in a clunky fashion. I don't think I will make a habit of this.
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Old 09-10-2015, 10:18 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by ipse dixit View Post
In the GT3, pulling both peddle is like stepping on the clutch while the car is still in gear, you can rev the engine up and drop the clutch like a traditional manual car with a third clutch pedal.
Right. That's the "donut mode" that comes with PDK-S (which is, of course, mostly, if not completely, just a software difference.)

Originally Posted by Need4S View Post
Immediately releasing the paddles worked! But if you are stopped or near stopped, it won't go back into gear without your foot on the brake.
All you need to do is put enough pressure on the brake to engage the switch. It takes a light touch, but there is a learnable range of force that will engage the switch without actually getting hydraulic pressure to the brakes.

Unless you have PCCB, in which case you may be screwed. PCCB is tuned for more "initial bite" (i.e. tuned to be "grabby".) I haven't tried this PDK feature in a PCCB Porsche. I'd be interested in reports from PCCB owners, if indeed the PCCB brakes are too grabby to be able to engage the brake pedal switch without very-noticeable braking force.

All the Audis (TT range, R8 family) are tuned for grabby brakes (steel or otherwise) so for those DSG Audis you pretty much cannot put the car into gear from a slow roll without coming to a stop. One (of many) reasons my 991 is not an R8.

It also seems to re-engage in a clunky fashion. I don't think I will make a habit of this.
Mine's very smooth. But, I've been using this feature since Stuttgart. Your PDK may have adapted differently.

Last edited by worf928; 09-10-2015 at 06:33 PM. Reason: stoopid ottokorect
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Old 09-10-2015, 04:44 PM
  #18  
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I to was able get the feature to work this afternoon as well, you have to release them VERY quickly.
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Old 09-11-2015, 07:06 AM
  #19  
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Why would anyone want to do this?
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:36 AM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by FBA View Post
Why would anyone want to do this?
Exactly what I asked... and after having just tried it a couple times, I'm still wondering!
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Old 09-11-2015, 11:42 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by worf928 View Post
Umm... because we can put it in neutral. And without moving our hands from the wheel. If that isn't sufficient how about this:
I get the whole neutral thing worf, have previously read that that neutral can be achieved from the steering wheel. What I meant was where are the benefits from doing so? Revving it up alongside a civic is not my bag personally, so other than that what are the other benefits?
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Old 09-11-2015, 12:41 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by speed21 View Post
... so other than that what are the other benefits?
It makes me happy.

You want objective, definable, arguable benefits? I got nothin'. I can make some stuff up that might be true...
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Old 09-11-2015, 12:49 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by worf928 View Post
It makes me happy.

You want objective, definable, arguable benefits? I got nothin'. I can make some stuff up that might be true...
Dayum! I was hoping you had something.
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Old 09-12-2015, 01:32 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by speed21 View Post
Dayum! I was hoping you had something.
Here, I'll make some stuff up for ya. Shifting into neutral may:

- prevent the hesitation-from-start that many PDK-driving folks report. Since the PDK ECU adapts to driving style, shifting into neutral when stopped or coasting to a stop may make the ECU realize that you want your PDK to act like a real manual rather than a viscous-coupled abortion-of-a-transmission from a 1973 Impala.

- lengthen the useful life of the fluid in the clutch pack so that when you get charged for a PDK flush that didn't actually happen, your PDK's expensive bits might not suffer as much as fast.

- lessen the wear on whatever PDK uses for a throw-out bearing and since the PDK has two of whatever that is, it's doubly-effective.
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Old 09-12-2015, 01:53 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by FBA View Post
Why would anyone want to do this?
With the GT3, it allows for a person to minimize understeer going into a turn.

Dunno about non-GT3 paddle-neutrals. Other than coasting down hills.
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Old 09-12-2015, 04:02 AM
  #26  
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On my Gallardo (2006), I used to use paddle-neutral coming up to red lights/stop signs/etc. after a really hard run (cooking the brakes) so that when I stopped, I could take my foot completely off the brake pedal (without the car creeping forward from being 'in gear') so that I wouldn't warp my rotors (from the heat transfer from rotors to calipers.)
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Old 09-23-2015, 02:44 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by worldattorney View Post
On my Gallardo (2006), I used to use paddle-neutral coming up to red lights/stop signs/etc.
I was about to post something similar.Indeed in Lambos pulling both paddles puts you in neutral.I use it coming to ever red light each and every time.If you let the car drop gears on its own you're wearing out the clutch more than you have to.Its better for the car to go to neutral than thru each individual gear.I haven't used a PDK car but I was assuming Porsche used the same method,i guess they dont.But Porsche clutches probably dont wear out as fast and aren't as expensive as a Lambo clutch.
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Old 09-23-2015, 06:40 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by alleykat View Post
...I haven't used a PDK car but I was assuming Porsche used the same method,i guess they dont.
You read the thread right? PDK certainly has the paddle neutral feature.
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