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Old 01-10-2018, 10:31 PM
  #16
MidEngineRules
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Originally Posted by Archimedes View Post
So except for entirely different engine, suspension, wheels, brakes, body panels, interior trim and electronics, they're exactly the same...
Ah, you're just being argumentative for giggles. Got it.
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Old 01-10-2018, 10:33 PM
  #17
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Originally Posted by Archimedes View Post
So except for entirely different engine, suspension, wheels, brakes, body panels, interior trim and electronics, they're exactly the same...
Technically the 987.2 also had new engines, transmissions, body panels and interior just like the 982.

I think after the release of the 718 Spyder we will see an entirely fresh design, on schedule just like in the past. I would even put a wager on it.
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Old 01-10-2018, 10:44 PM
  #18
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Originally Posted by Marine Blue View Post


Technically the 987.2 also had new engines, transmissions, body panels and interior just like the 982.

I think after the release of the 718 Spyder we will see an entirely fresh design, on schedule just like in the past. I would even put a wager on it.
Ding Ding Ding... Winner!
Technically the base platform (skeleton if you will) for the 981 and 982 are built upon are the same. The 986, 987, 981 were all different platforms from which the actual geometry is completely different, where the 987.1 to 987.2 and 981 to 982 share platforms and use the same geometry.
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Old 01-10-2018, 11:48 PM
  #19
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Platform change is what I'm trying to figure out. Regardless of how many changes they made from 981 --> 982, it's still on the same platform. Same chassis dimensions, construction (materials), underlying electronics and hardware that dates back to around 2012.

It's hard to believe that Porsche will continue making the 982 chassis with the 992 starting production later this year. There has to be cost savings by moving to a '983' Boxster and Cayman, and again sharing parts with the 992. So the question is what people think about either...
  • A '983' coming out 18-24 months from now, or
  • 982.2 coming out 18-24 months from now, and a '983' coming out another ~3 years after that... although that seems like a long time to keep a 2012 chassis in production...
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Old 01-11-2018, 02:35 AM
  #20
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The Carrera chassis and the Cayman chassis are entirely different animals. Assuming one will change with the other is a mistake.

Will the next Cayman/Boxster be different? Sure. But so was the 718 vs. the 981. Go compare part numbers. I'll bet you 85+% of the car was new in the 718, but you can believe whatever you want. Sounds like you're just trying to support a conclusion you've already made.
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Old 01-11-2018, 03:48 PM
  #21
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Large parts of the structure of the 981 and 991 car are identical, especially from the aft edge of the door openings forward. Not talking about exterior body panels or interior trim panels. Talking about the structure itself. From the aft edge of the door openings rearward, there are major differences, maybe even 100%, structure-wise. Front suspension and steering components are very similar or identical between the 981 and 991. Rear suspension is of course very different.
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Old 01-11-2018, 05:28 PM
  #22
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Originally Posted by okie981 View Post
Large parts of the structure of the 981 and 991 car are identical, especially from the aft edge of the door openings forward. Not talking about exterior body panels or interior trim panels. Talking about the structure itself. From the aft edge of the door openings rearward, there are major differences, maybe even 100%, structure-wise. Front suspension and steering components are very similar or identical between the 981 and 991. Rear suspension is of course very different.
So you're saying some of the sheet metal on the bottom of the car is similar, but everything else is different? Because those two cars have different wheelbases, different front and rear tracks, different suspension geometry and components, different engines, different transmissions, different engine placement, entirely different bodies and largely different interiors. Maybe they share an ashtray?

Back on topic though, the 718 and the 981 are entirely different cars. Hence why they didn't just call it the 981.2.
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Old 01-11-2018, 07:27 PM
  #23
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Originally Posted by okie981 View Post
Large parts of the structure of the 981 and 991 car are identical, especially from the aft edge of the door openings forward. Not talking about exterior body panels or interior trim panels. Talking about the structure itself. From the aft edge of the door openings rearward, there are major differences, maybe even 100%, structure-wise. Front suspension and steering components are very similar or identical between the 981 and 991. Rear suspension is of course very different.
In trying to convert my Spyder's interior door pulls to what I think are the nicer Boxster handles, I found the interior panels and parts were interchangeable between the 981 and 991. So there's that.
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Old 01-11-2018, 09:30 PM
  #24
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Originally Posted by Porschefan604 View Post
Platform change is what I'm trying to figure out. Regardless of how many changes they made from 981 --> 982, it's still on the same platform. Same chassis dimensions, construction (materials), underlying electronics and hardware that dates back to around 2012.

It's hard to believe that Porsche will continue making the 982 chassis with the 992 starting production later this year. There has to be cost savings by moving to a '983' Boxster and Cayman, and again sharing parts with the 992. So the question is what people think about either...
  • A '983' coming out 18-24 months from now, or
  • 982.2 coming out 18-24 months from now, and a '983' coming out another ~3 years after that... although that seems like a long time to keep a 2012 chassis in production...
I agree 12 years with basically the same design aesthetic is market suicide for the 982. The 986 and 987 lasted 8 model years each. The 981 just 4 even though as we all know the 982 is basically a continuation within the generation with perhaps more changes than typical of a .2 version (power plant change required the vast majority of changes which has been misreported of late). At this point I'm willing to bet the 981/982 generation run is 8 total years too. With that, now I really believe there won't be a 982.2. Regardless if the average Porsche consumer can tell the difference, the basic 981/982 design is in its 7th year of life from a marketing view point. It's getting dated already. Fresh sells. I'm sure the 983 already exists in drawings and models and Porsche is moving toward production. My bet is 2021 for an all new Boxster/Cayman, perhaps 2020 if sales continue to slide south. A 983 with 6 cylinders (turbo) would be nice, or even an all electric version to spice it up for enthusiasts. How exciting would that be! I really don't see a subsequent generation for the turbo 4 based on today's mixed impressions among the faithful. Consumers vote with their wallets, and their votes aren't typical of a new model. I believe the promise of something bigger in store is why so many are skeptical to own one right now knowing the next thing could be a huge departure (i.e., electric). If there is a 982.2, we all know it would be the one to own as the .1s are typically the least desired in the used market per generation. The only exception to this these days is the 991.1, since it's the last of the NA era. There is no 981.1. Being the last of the NA era too, like the 991.1 the 981 will always be in good demand and eventually collectable, especially the GTS, Spyder and GT4 which are the most enthusiast-focused Boxsters/Caymans to date visually and functionally. I do believe we'll see an all electric Boxster/Cayman next after the 981/982 generation ends. It may not be the only power offering, but it's due. I wouldn't be disappointed if it were the only offering. After all Porsche did quite a lot of research and testing with the 987 eBoxster. I'd rather see full electric than another turbo. At least the power is linear. Time is right to usher in a new era.
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Old 01-11-2018, 10:18 PM
  #25
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Originally Posted by Archimedes View Post
So you're saying some of the sheet metal on the bottom of the car is similar, but everything else is different? Because those two cars have different wheelbases, different front and rear tracks, different suspension geometry and components, different engines, different transmissions, different engine placement, entirely different bodies and largely different interiors. Maybe they share an ashtray?

Back on topic though, the 718 and the 981 are entirely different cars. Hence why they didn't just call it the 981.2.
Ok, I'll bite. The 718 and 981 are not entirely different cars. From your posts and responses on this thread, I know I and others understand quite a bit more about the construction of the 981 and 991 cars than you do. Just because the model number the car is called by changed does not signify an "entirely" different car. The 718 number is more a marketing ploy than to signify a different car. Porsche wanted to ease the 4-cyl transformation into the minds of the buying public, and tie the car to the 718 of the past that was also 4-cyl with racing heritage. There is a lot more common between the 718, 981, and 991 than "the sheet metal on the bottom of the car". Have you worked in the automotive industry as a design engineer? I have. I understand construction. From your posts, I can see your understanding of car construction is limited.
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Old 01-11-2018, 10:21 PM
  #26
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Originally Posted by SpyderSenseOC View Post
In trying to convert my Spyder's interior door pulls to what I think are the nicer Boxster handles, I found the interior panels and parts were interchangeable between the 981 and 991. So there's that.
Yep, many, many parts are identical or very, very similar.
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Old 01-12-2018, 12:38 AM
  #27
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Originally Posted by okie981 View Post
Yep, many, many parts are identical or very, very similar.
In all fairness when Porsche opted to change the power plants it caused a ripple effect on having to update other bits. They retuned the suspension, had to beef up the clutch, elected to move the motor a bit causing the need for different engine mounts and subsequent modifications to many panels. They also elected to cosmetically change the upper dash and fit a new windshield and had to address different cooling needs. I always thought the 981 brakes were on the small side so they enlarged those as well. Had there been a 981.2 I'm sure Porsche would have done some similar changes as part of a typical refresh. When Porsche updated the 997.1 to .2 they also lowered the engine within the chassis causing a similar redesign to include the suspension since that was the issue they were trying to solve. It's nothing extraordinary. This wasn't major surgery. It was a systematic modification of an existing platform. Why Porsche elected to change the designation to 982 is anyone's guess. They are still kin unlike any changes after a model's typical 8-year run. I will never view the 982 as something completely different from the 981. They're first cousins!
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Old 01-12-2018, 02:56 AM
  #28
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Originally Posted by MidEngineRules View Post
In all fairness when Porsche opted to change the power plants it caused a ripple effect on having to update other bits. They retuned the suspension, had to beef up the clutch, elected to move the motor a bit causing the need for different engine mounts and subsequent modifications to many panels. They also elected to cosmetically change the upper dash and fit a new windshield and had to address different cooling needs. I always thought the 981 brakes were on the small side so they enlarged those as well. Had there been a 981.2 I'm sure Porsche would have done some similar changes as part of a typical refresh. When Porsche updated the 997.1 to .2 they also lowered the engine within the chassis causing a similar redesign to include the suspension since that was the issue they were trying to solve. It's nothing extraordinary. This wasn't major surgery. It was a systematic modification of an existing platform. Why Porsche elected to change the designation to 982 is anyone's guess. They are still kin unlike any changes after a model's typical 8-year run. I will never view the 982 as something completely different from the 981. They're first cousins!
+1 Thatĺs been my view as well.
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Old 01-13-2018, 03:25 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by Noah Fect View Post
It's a perfectly fine car. All they need to do is price it correctly for the four-cylinder market, and it will succeed. But hey, this is Porsche we're talking about here...
To your point I recall reading a couple years ago that Porsche was strongly considering offering a less expensive 4 cyl car. The thought was that the pricing was going to be in the sub $50K area to compete with cars like the Audi TT.
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Old 01-13-2018, 03:45 PM
  #30
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Originally Posted by fast1 View Post
To your point I recall reading a couple years ago that Porsche was strongly considering offering a less expensive 4 cyl car. The thought was that the pricing was going to be in the sub $50K area to compete with cars like the Audi TT.
That would make perfect sense if you look at the Alfa 4c which is a direct competitor. It could be Porsche is looking beyond all this as they look to usher in the electric sports car era. Which is interesting when you consider the sound debate. Actually having the muted sound of the turbo 4 will help them transition to electric. It would be quite a shock to go from the NA roar to electric. Having the turbo 4 in place today is taking sound out of the equation as an integral part of the Porsche sports car experience. One day I'll own an electric Porsche I'm sure. I won't ever give up my flat 6 NA for it.
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