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Ready to change motor mounts. What else while at it?

 
Old 11-06-2018, 07:57 PM
  #16  
captainOCD
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Ok, I'm gonna need some education here. What's the reasoning for checking the rod bearings? I've never heard that mentioned as something to check on a motor that's running good before.
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Old 11-06-2018, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by captainOCD View Post
Ok, I'm gonna need some education here. What's the reasoning for checking the rod bearings? I've never heard that mentioned as something to check on a motor that's running good before.
It's common for extra wear on #2 and #6. If you do check them you will need new nuts as the rod nuts are single use.

https://rennlist.com/forums/928-foru...-bearings.html

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Old 11-06-2018, 08:26 PM
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Ok. So any more detailed guides on removing the bearings for inspection and reinstalling? I'm fairly confident with working on most parts of an engine, but the bottom end and bearing clearances, etc are definitely outside of my comfort zone. I don't want to end up doing more harm than good here.
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Old 11-06-2018, 11:25 PM
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Something else you could consider while you are down there is the remove exhaust test pipes and cap the manifolds. Same thread as lug nuts but you can find a large acorn nut at Belmetric.com.
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Old 11-07-2018, 11:32 AM
  #20  
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The level sender gasket reminded me...

Oil level sender connector boot. The rubber boot that protects the connector. Yours is almost certainly toast (really - cooked to the point that it's really crispy).

Roger has them for like $12. Unavailable for a looooong time until a couple years ago.

And you mention 'some orders'.

Why? Roger has everything, and you'd only pay for shipping once.
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Old 11-07-2018, 02:27 PM
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Looked like there was some stuff he didn't have looking on his site.
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Old 11-07-2018, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by captainOCD View Post
Looked like there was some stuff he didn't have looking on his site.
Don't look at the site.

Call or e-mail. There is basically NOTHING he doesn't have or cannot get.
Also, he has the Volvo MMs with the pin already ground off (see Dwayne's write up to understand).

You could send an e-mail asking "I'm doing my Motor Mounts, what else should I think about doing while I'm in there?" and he will send you all the suggestions (basically what's above in the thread).

You could call and ask the same question. Make sure you have a good bit of time to spare if you decide to call. I usually spend at least 15 min or so just chatting with him about the car.
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Old 11-07-2018, 06:26 PM
  #23  
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Just got off the phone with Roger. He's getting a quote together for me on all the parts.
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Old 11-07-2018, 07:37 PM
  #24  
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While having the oil pan off, you may consider replacing the pan bolts with a stud kit. Makes everything much easier to align when putting the pan/ gasket back on.
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Old 11-13-2018, 09:24 PM
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A box a parts arrived from Roger today.


I spent a couple hours after work today getting some stuff out of the way. Got as far as getting the rack loose.


And of course there is more evidence of the spider colony that one inhabited the car.

I did remove the old steering rack bushings. The centers pushed right out by hand, as did the rubber.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:07 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by captainOCD View Post
A box a parts arrived from Roger today.


I spent a couple hours after work today getting some stuff out of the way. Got as far as getting the rack loose.


And of course there is more evidence of the spider colony that one inhabited the car.

I did remove the old steering rack bushings. The centers pushed right out by hand, as did the rubber.

I'll try and get the responses in order:



Great!

Good start. Consider attacking with engine cleaner and such now. The rack and the shield are down so the cavity in the crossmember is available for flushing. Drain the oil first but leave the filter there until cleaning is done. Cover the alternator first, but otherwise pretty much everything on the block, frame and suspension is fair game for serious cleaning. After the engine cleaner, a second bath of your favorite car-wash detergent will help with residue. Do Not Use Any Of The Purple Degreasers. The foamy engine brite is solvents plus emulsifiers, and is safe for aluminum. The purple stuff is caustic, and is specifically not safe for aluminum. Read the label. One of those free to two dollar Harbor Freight plastic tarps makes a great rinse shield for the floor and the stands. Tie-wrap the tarp to the stands so the rear prevents rearward crud migration while rinsing. Saves a bunch of floor cleanup under the car later, and will hold some of the crud for easier disposal.

Remove evidence of spider colony that once inhabited the car.

You are 75% of the way on the steering rack bushings. The fact that the rubber pushed out easily is evidence of the need to replace. The other 90% of the bushing removal is getting those outer steel sleeves from the rack ears. These were the outside of the original bushings, with the rubber bonded to them. I used a sharp small flat chisel and a tapping hammer to gently un-mushroom one side of each bushing. Then grab what you can with pliers and twist to collapse the shell and remove. Others report good results using an air chisel. I didn't want to risk scarring the ears, so too the more surgical approach.

Reminders: Battery is disconnected, and you'll want to take a picture of the cable bundle where it passes the starter and then turns back. Ditto the routing of the harness from forward that joins the battery cable. Ditto the power steering lines connection to the rack, and how they route and attach to the crossmember. Keep the fasteners in logical groups by application/location, noting where some are "the same but longer" in what looks like the same duty. I use some saved kitchen plastic cups.

I keep a plastic coffee container, the one with the big lid and a handle on it. Put an inch or three of deodorized mineral spirits in there. Drop a fasteners group in there, screw the lid on. Shake well to agitate the pieces and get them clean. Inspect, repeat if needed. Use a magnet to extract the pieces, rinse in mild Dawn dish-washing detergent, rinse again and allow to dry. Takes a LOT of the work out of small-parts cleaning.

Have fun!
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:21 PM
  #27  
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I did spray some degreaser on it last night, but without using any water (didn't feel like messing with the hose when it was cold out) it didn't seem to do much. Might try some brushing before hauling out the hose.




I do still need to get the sleeve out of the rack ears, hopefully without too much trouble. Nuts/bolts are bagged and marked in zip lock bags. Pictures are being taken. Fortunately I have two other cars I can look at if I get stuck too.

That's a good idea with the coffee can. Normally I use some gas and a brush to clean bolts and stuff. Works good for killing fire ants at that point too.
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Old 11-14-2018, 01:33 AM
  #28  
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The foamy cleaner works by softening the oil hold, then the hose and the surfactant dissolve it and it gets washed away. It's an iterative process for serious stuff. That's why I share half a dozen spray cans to MM/OPG candidates. A stiff-bristle parts-cleaning brush helps with the thicker deposits, and maybe a scraper first for the really thick stuff. Anything you can shave off is less to dissolve off.

For those playing along at home, do as much of the cleaning as you can at the pay-to-spray carwash. Bring coveralls, glasses and a hat, and have the trays off already. The engine should be warm but not hot. Ramps are wonderful for this duty. That first slimy MM/OPG was perhaps the most miserable project on the car. Now that it's all clean and kept clean under there, the second episode was almost a pleasure really. Still some crud hiding out, but infinitely better than the first time.

A clinic guest took the six cans but returned five on work day. Didn't need them. Another slimy mess, He was working on the lift, and got only essential support when he really needed the extra two hands. Eeeew!
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Old 11-14-2018, 07:00 PM
  #29  
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So unless I'm horribly mistaken, it appears there were no outer sleeves on the bushings in my rack.

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Old 11-14-2018, 11:32 PM
  #30  
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Grab your new bushings and see if they fit. If they go in you are golden. If not, there is something left in the holes.
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