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Old 08-18-2011, 03:12 PM   #1
earossi
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Default Fix for Failing Clear Coat

I just noticed a small place on the roof of my car where the clear coat appears to be turning a "yellow-brown". About half the size of a dime and oval in shape. Though I cannot feel any difference in the surface of the clearcoat, I am assuming that what I am witnessing is the degradation of clear where it has become thinned from to much polishing over the years.

If such is the case, is there a way to "fix" the issue? Or, will I have to respray the color and clear coats to restore the surface? If I were to just rough up the remaining clear and then re-clear the entire roof would the spot that I am noticing disappear?
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98 Carrera S Coupe - Arena Red
93 968 Coupe - Guards Red (gone)
93 968 Cab - Averntine Green (gone)
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Old 08-19-2011, 09:06 AM   #2
TOGWT
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Two- stage paint system- (base, colour and clear coat)

A clear-coat finish does not oxidize in the true sense of the word; meaning that the pigments and resins mix together and the pigments are exposed to the sun's ultra-violet rays (UV-A), which cause them to dry out; this is not oxidation, but clear coat failure.

The clear coat, which contains ultra violet (UV) protection is applied to protect against this but the finish will become ‘dull’ by using harsh (abrasive) or if acidic car washing solutions as used in ‘touch less’ car washing systems, or from industrial airborne pollutants compromising the clear coat allowing the suns heat to dry out the paints resin binder system.

The clear coat layer is extremely thin (1.5 – 2.0 Mils) it is not a solid coating and is to some extent porous, oxygen interacts with substances in the paint layer (i.e. flakes as in metallic paints) and trigger the oxidation reaction. It's just that the amount of oxidation taking place is minimal in comparison to single stage paint.

For oxidized paint try the following (this is only a temporary ‘fix’)
• Wash the paint surface and dry thoroughly
• Clean the paint with chemical paint cleaner (Klasse All-In-One) using an Lake County (LC) orange foam pad at speed #4, this may take 2-3 applications
• If a chemical paint cleaner doesn’t remove the oxidation use a (LC) purple foamed wool (PFW) pad and Menzerna’s Power Gloss (POS 34A) or Meguiar’s M105, clean or replace with a clean pad as the oxidized paint will load the pad
• A foam pad will transfer kinetic (friction) heat to the paint and may exasperate the problem
• Using Gloss It EVP Pad Prime will help maintain sufficient oil lubrication for the polish
• Wet-sanding will remove ‘oxidation’ debris, which may remove too much clear coat
• Once the oxidation has been removed use a decontamination system (Aquartz Iron Cut)
• Apply an oil rich product to stabilize the paints binder system (3M Imperial Hand Glaze) apply a thick coat and allow to dwell for 12-24 hours before buffing, repeat as necessary until surface has an ‘oily’ sheen.
• Remove residue and apply a polymer coating (Opti-Coat™) for protection.
• Try to keep vehicle paint surface away from UV heat radiation
• Keep paint surface waxed on a regular basis.

Temporary remedy – wash and dry the surface, and then use a chemical paint cleaner (Klasse AIO)Check the paint thickness and there is sufficient thickness polish the surface (Meguiar’s M105)Apply a coating (Opti-Coat™) for protection
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Old 08-20-2011, 01:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TOGWT View Post
Two- stage paint system- (base, colour and clear coat)

A clear-coat finish does not oxidize in the true sense of the word; meaning that the pigments and resins mix together and the pigments are exposed to the sun's ultra-violet rays (UV-A), which cause them to dry out; this is not oxidation, but clear coat failure.

The clear coat, which contains ultra violet (UV) protection is applied to protect against this but the finish will become ‘dull’ by using harsh (abrasive) or if acidic car washing solutions as used in ‘touch less’ car washing systems, or from industrial airborne pollutants compromising the clear coat allowing the suns heat to dry out the paints resin binder system.

The clear coat layer is extremely thin (1.5 – 2.0 Mils) it is not a solid coating and is to some extent porous, oxygen interacts with substances in the paint layer (i.e. flakes as in metallic paints) and trigger the oxidation reaction. It's just that the amount of oxidation taking place is minimal in comparison to single stage paint.

For oxidized paint try the following (this is only a temporary ‘fix’)
• Wash the paint surface and dry thoroughly
• Clean the paint with chemical paint cleaner (Klasse All-In-One) using an Lake County (LC) orange foam pad at speed #4, this may take 2-3 applications
• If a chemical paint cleaner doesn’t remove the oxidation use a (LC) purple foamed wool (PFW) pad and Menzerna’s Power Gloss (POS 34A) or Meguiar’s M105, clean or replace with a clean pad as the oxidized paint will load the pad
• A foam pad will transfer kinetic (friction) heat to the paint and may exasperate the problem
• Using Gloss It EVP Pad Prime will help maintain sufficient oil lubrication for the polish
• Wet-sanding will remove ‘oxidation’ debris, which may remove too much clear coat
• Once the oxidation has been removed use a decontamination system (Aquartz Iron Cut)
• Apply an oil rich product to stabilize the paints binder system (3M Imperial Hand Glaze) apply a thick coat and allow to dwell for 12-24 hours before buffing, repeat as necessary until surface has an ‘oily’ sheen.
• Remove residue and apply a polymer coating (Opti-Coat™) for protection.
• Try to keep vehicle paint surface away from UV heat radiation
• Keep paint surface waxed on a regular basis.

Temporary remedy – wash and dry the surface, and then use a chemical paint cleaner (Klasse AIO)Check the paint thickness and there is sufficient thickness polish the surface (Meguiar’s M105)Apply a coating (Opti-Coat™) for protection

Thanks so much. Of interest were your comments about the clear coat being "porous", which was a surprise to me. So, does wax close up the pores in the CC and make it non-porous? Perhaps that is my issue.

I have taken my time buffing out my car, meaning that the buffed surfaces have gone weeks without any protection. No sealant or wax. So, could what I am seeing be a type of surface "rust" (it is that color) where the metallics in the Arena Red paint base are actually corroding? If so, using the iron type product you recommended.....will that remove the rust products from the same area?

FYI, the car is always garaged, and is most times covered when I take it to work.

My intent was to use a sealant on the car once I have buffed out all the swirl marks using Merzania products. And, then I was thinking about applying a coat of Pinnacle wax on top of the sealant. Any comments abou that arrangement?
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98 Carrera S Coupe - Arena Red
93 968 Coupe - Guards Red (gone)
93 968 Cab - Averntine Green (gone)
89 911 Carrera Targa - Triple Black (gone)
86 944 Coupe - Champaign (gone)
71 911E Targa - Iris Blue (gone)
70 911T Coupe - Orange (gone)
66 911 Coupe - Silver - Car that started this addiction! (gone)
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Old 08-20-2011, 07:05 PM   #4
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A paint surface, once its aged by environmental protestant, especially acids, has many micro-fissures that makes it porous.

A wax or sealant provides protection from ultra violet radiation and will provide a sacrificial protection for the paint surface.

The clear coat provides protection for the metallic flakes and prevents corrosion (these are the red spots you are seeing)

If you use a chemical cleaner (Klasse) and then a light plash to remove any oxidation and lastly apply Opti-Coat as a permanent clear coating to bolster the clear coat.

A sealant and wax will provide protection but with limited durability (compared to a coating like Opti-Coat)
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Old 08-23-2011, 04:01 PM   #5
Jim Devine
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Probably not too much you could do that would be
a permanent fix. I have a Lincoln that started out that way & progressed to most of the top surfaces
having the clear coat fail.
Don't know if it's true of not, but it was explained to me that the heat from the sun warms the metal &
after the paint ages and hardens, won't flex &
bakes itself off the car.
Don't wash it in a car wash- the pressure might be enough to blow it off.
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Old 08-24-2011, 09:03 AM   #6
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[Don't know if it's true of not, but it was explained to me that the heat from the sun warms the metal &
after the paint ages and hardens, won't flex &
bakes itself off the car]

Ultra violet (UV-A) infrared dries out the resin binder of the paint system, which causes it to lose its fleaxability and also causes delamination from its substrate.Applying an oil rich product to stabilize the paints binder system (3M Imperial Hand Glaze) apply a thick coat and allow to dwell for 12-24 hours before buffing, repeat as necessary until surface has an ‘oily’ sheen (this is only a temporary 'fix)
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Old 08-24-2011, 09:03 AM
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